Orphaned Newborn Alpaca Thrives When Telepathic Communication with Him, His Deceased Mother, and the Herd Creates Optimal Solutions for Survival.

© Nedda Wittels, January 8, 2020.

Newborn Milano, baby alpaca (cria) about one day old.

As soon as I picked up the phone and heard Keiko’s voice, I knew something urgent was going on.

Star nursing her newborn son, Milano

Star nursing her newborn son, Milano

Star, mother of a newborn Alpaca, called a cria, had died within 24 hours of his birth.

Fortunately, she had been able to nurse the baby, so he did get collostrum, the milk that contains all the antibodies a new born animal needs until the immune system develops.

But now Keiko had to figure out how to keep this spunky little boy alive.

There was no other lactating female alpaca on the farm to become a mother substitute for Milano.

He would have to nurse from a bottle every 2 hours for many weeks and it would take at least 6-8 months before he no longer needed milk.

Another complication was that male baby alpacas that bond with human mother substitutes can be very aggressive to humans as they mature.  Young male alpacas naturally practice mounting their mothers, and for a teenage or adult alpaca to do that to a human would be highly dangerous to the human.

The Animal Communication session was complex.  We needed to

  • Reassure Milano that he would be loved and cared for despite his loss of Star, his mother.
  • Find a female adult alpaca in the herd willing to be a mother substitute without nursing Milano.  Dezi volunteered.
  • Calm the herd due to the sudden, unexpected death of Star, who had been part of the herd for years, and help with their grieving.
  • Ask Milano’s father, who lives on the farm with other male lamas, to assist in raising Miliano.
  • Speak to Star, now in spirit, about her unexpected passing.
  • Brainstorm with Keiko and the herd to figure out how to get Milano to nurse from bottles, but associate them with alpacas, and not bond inappropriately with humans.

When animals live in a herd situation, there is a definite herd consciousness in addition to the individual consciousness of each herd member.  Basically, everyone is telepathically connected all the time, although individuals can sometimes protect themselves from something going on that makes that individual uncomfortable.

In this session, I had to be able to speak to many individuals as individual; to the herd in general, and to the spirit of Star.

During the session we helped everyone cope with their feelings and asked various members of the herd to help out in various ways.  Then the herd was invited to brainstormed with Keiko and me on how to best care for Milano.

I asked Keiko to keep me up to date on how things developed, as any glitch in the plan could quickly cause a young cria to experience a serious setback.

In the latest update from Keiko, January 8, 2020, she wrote,

Milano and herd at 3 weeks old.

Milano at 3 weeks old with his herd of female alpaca.

Milano is now 3 weeks and 2 days old! He has doubled his birth weight and is really doing well.  He’ll need to be bottle fed during the night for more weeks, but I am very relieved.  He seems to be thriving.

During the day he is with the entire herd. At night, we put him in a smaller pen with Dezi and a few volunteers lately.   His full sister who will stay here [on our farm], Sophie, has been watching him more lately, and she looks the closest to Star (mom we lost) so every once in a while, I gasp.

Today I received this testimonial from Keiko.

Thank you so much, Nedda, for helping me navigate an emotionally intense, complex situation when we lost a mama alpaca and suddenly had a 36 hour old orphaned cria for the first time on our farm.

I couldn’t think clearly as the loss was unexpected and sudden- but I knew the focus had to be on the cria and I had no time to lose if I wanted the cria to survive. But I sure felt too emotional to do this on my own.

I was SOOOO happy and relieved when you were able to squeeze in a session for me right away. I can’t tell you how much that meant to me.  You helped me think things through and figure out how to involve the herd for best results.

Now, 3.5 weeks later- baby is thriving! We have a nice little routine going and although not the most ideal situation since we don’t have his mama..I feel because of your help and the action plan we were able to set up as soon as we did, we have been able to move forward as a family and herd and find all the blessings.

The herd has followed through with the commitments they made, although they need reminders every once in a while.  Dezi, who accepted the adult guardian alpaca role, really has stepped up in her role [as Milano’s substitute mother].

We’re still in it for the long haul since it takes 6 months for alpaca babies to wean…but I am thrilled with the results you have been able to help me get through just one session!!! Thank you and much love!!!”

Keiko Makarczyk, Taylor,  TX.
Wisteria Suri Ranch
https://wisteriasuriranch.com/

I’m so grateful that I could be of service to Keiko, Milano, and the herd.  Animal Communication proves again and again that telepathy with animals is a powerful way for humans and animals to share love and problem solve.

Comments

2 Responses to “Orphaned Newborn Alpaca Thrives When Telepathic Communication with Him, His Deceased Mother, and the Herd Creates Optimal Solutions for Survival.”
  1. Such a beautiful story. I’ve know Keiko for some time, she is so connected to her animals and so in tune with them and what they desire. I’m so happy that Keiko was able to connect with you and the herd to create this plan with looks to be working AMAZINGLY! Little Milano is a blessed boy!

  2. Jennifer says:

    Great job, Nedda! Many thanks to you, Dezy, the herd and of course Star and Milano.