Melissa Returns: Saving a Traumatized Kitten

 

Overcoming Trauma and Grief at 10 Weeks Old

by Nedda Wittels
Copyright © 2022

Crate with litter box, cave, and food.

Melissa’s safe space.

Melissa arrived at my house around 11 p.m. on Friday, December 10, 2021, after more than 12 hours of travel, most of which was on Amtrak.

She was in a state of physical, mental, and emotional exhaustion and trauma.

She was grieving intensely for her mother, father, siblings, and extended family, who all lived together in a feline community at Indian Spring Cattery in Virginia.

The trip on Amtrak had been noise, jostling, and terrifying to Melissa.

She hadn’t eaten or had anything to drink since that morning.  (Kittens typically don’t want to eat or drink when traveling, and to prevent travel sickness, they’re not usually offered food on a one-day trip.)

Melissa was also confused:  she wasn’t sure she had arrived where she was supposed to be!

It was dark in the car on the ride home from New Haven, so I couldn’t see how upset Melissa was.

I inadvertently added to her confusion by asking her what her name was. With her new body and beautiful clear energy, I had supposed that she might have chosen a new name.

I discovered days later that my questions about a name caused Melissa to decide that I didn’t recognize her and that she had had been given to the wrong person.

When she was finally able to talk to me about her name, it was clear that Melissa was the name she wanted, as it would prove to her that I knew who she was.

Cary Hanson, assistant to Dr. Doug Shar who owns Indian Spring Cattery, had brought Melissa to New Haven.  She was in Connecticut visiting family, and generously gave me her phone number in case there were problems.

I am very, very grateful to Cary for all her help that weekend.  We spoke several times, and her assistance was invaluable and critical to a successful turn around for Melissa.

First Things First:  Food, Water, and Electrolytes.

Melissa exploring inside the crate.

Melissa looking at a towel I used to keep the crate door from closing.

Every kitten at 10 weeks of age needs to eat at least 4 times a day and possibly more often that that.

Kittens grow very fast, but their tiny stomachs can’t hold enough food to keep up with their need for nutrition.

It’s best to have bowls of food available for free choice eating 24/7 so they can eat whenever they’re hungry.

Once at my house, I offered Melissa food and water, but she refused everything.

The canned food was exactly what the Indian Spring said they had been feeding the kittens, so it was familiar to her.

I also showed her the litter box, which had the same litter she was familiar with.  Fortunately, she immediately urinated in the litter box.

Then I noticed that Melissa was drooling.  This is a sign of severe distress.  It also meant fluid loss, which wasn’t a good thing since she wasn’t drinking.

Water and Electrolytes by Dropper

When she refused to eat or drink, I immediately started giving her both plain water and electrolytes by dropper.

Melissa clamped her mouth tightly shut and struggled to get out of my strong but gentle hold on her.

I had to force tiny drops of liquid into the side of her mouth – just 2 or 3 drops at a time so she wouldn’t choke on them.

The wet food was pate, and I added a bit of water and electrolytes and tried to get that into her as well, but had little success.  She kept spitting out whatever I managed to get into her mouth.

By Saturday afternoon I was very worried.

Important Products to Help Melissa Relax

I did the best I could to create a peaceful, loving space for her.

Rescue Remedy – I put some directly onto Melissa and misted it around the room.  This seemed to have little to no effect.

Grief Relief (FES brand) flower essence formula – I put some on her paws, face, and body, but it didn’t seem to help, either.

Homeopathic Ignatia 30 C – I gave her a dose of this remedy well known for assisting with trauma and grieving.  This, too, had no observable effect.

Feliway, the feline pheromone spray – On Saturday, I ran out and bought a spray bottle of it since the plugins I had ordered hadn’t arrived.  It’s  supposed to help cats and kittens calm down.  I sprayed some onto a soft, cuddly toy I had bought and put it into the cat cave, encouraging Melissa cuddle up with it.  She refused to have anything to do with it.

Peaceful Music – I began to chant a very peaceful Sanskrit chant that ‘s used in the ashram I go to at mealtimes.  It did seem to quiet her a bit, but she still drooled and refused food.

Gentle, Loving Handling

I cut up a very old, super-soft wash cloth into 4 pieces, using them to gently wash and dry her off.  She enjoyed being rubbed, but continued to drool.

In fact, if anything in the room moved, including me, her drooling would intensify, or if previously stopped for a moment, immediately start up again.

I had a soft brush I had bought that felt like a cat tongue, but Melissa didn’t seem to like it much.  I decided it was probably too harsh for her tender little body.

Melissa didn’t want me to pick her up, didn’t make eye contact, didn’t try to connect with me.  She just lay limply in my arms, and when she did move, would bite or scratch me and try to get away.

Did I think I had a kitten-proof room?

I was keeping Melissa in the crate at night, hoping that would help her feel safe.

During the day, I encouraged her to move around the room – to stretch, to use a scratching post, and to explore her space.  I even hoped she might become interested in a toy or two.

Despite all my careful plans for kitten-proofing the room, Melissa would look for and find places to hide.

I had to keep moving things around to make sure I could find her to try to get food and water into her, and that upset her, too.

Overwhelming Grief and Depression

Whenever I lifted Melissa out of her bed to hold her, feed her, and clean off the drool, I would talk to her.

I told her how happy I was that she had come back.

I told her how much I loved her, and that Starlight and I were very happy to see her in her new, beautiful body.

I told her that I knew I couldn’t replace her real mother – that I wouldn’t even try.  I knew her mother was very special, and that I loved her parents for giving her this new life.

I told her that I would take very good care of her and help her settle in to her new home.

I told her how important is was that she eat and drink on her own.

Melissa wasn’t saying much back to me except an occasional “I want to go home” in the saddest, most grief-stricken little telepathic voice imaginable.

Home was where her parents were, not here.

Melissa’s longing for home – her mother especially – was so intense, so plaintive that I felt like crying myself.

No matter what I did, she refused to be comforted.

I could feel Melissa’s intense grief and sadness.  Because I’m a strong empath, I could also feel Golda, her mother, was very worried about her.  Golda’s energy was all around Melissa trying desperately to comfort and support her.  I telepathically reassured Golda that I was doing all I could for her daughter.

While between incarnations, Melissa had told me she had found the perfect mother – someone who was very warm, loving, and nurturing.  Golda certainly fit the bill.

Melissa longed for the touch of her mother’s tongue, the smell of her mother’s body, and the warmth a kitten feels when piled up with siblings and family.

I felt like I had stolen someone’s child!  How is it we think it’s fine to take 8 or 9 or even 10 or 12-week old babies from healthy mothers just because they’re kittens or puppies and are eating from a bowl instead of a nipple?

How can we justify this?

I had never thought about the emotional impact of it, nor about the loss the parents of these babies must feel.

To see a photo and read a description of Golda, tap or click on this link
Indian Spring Cats: Meet the Parents
and scroll down the page a bit.
To see and read about Choco, Melissa’s father, scroll a bit further.

Starlight’s Experience Had Been Very Different

Starlight shortly after she arrived.

When Starlight came to me in 2012 at 9 weeks of age, she was ready to come – excited to come.

While she missed the large family she had had at Reprise Siamese Cattery, she was thrilled to be back with me.

Starlight was filled with joy and love when she arrived.  She recognized me immediately, ate well, and was playful.  She had never been a cat before, so she was figuring it all out.

Starlight is a very sensitive being, and she got all the attention a baby needed.

I thought I was prepared to take care of Melissa, but I quickly realized that Melissa needed me to be even more attentive and nurturing.

The Danger of Dehydration Had to Be Overcome.

Both dehydration and lack of food cause mental confusion and can lead to death. Dehydration also causes an animal to reject food.

While Melissa didn’t immediately need veterinary care, I was determined to do as much as I could to avoid taking Melissa to an emergency clinic for subcutaneous fluids.  That experience, while helpful physically, would add to her trauma.

Could I get her through this and avoid another car trip, avoid going into a strange place with people she didn’t know and smells and sounds that might frighten her even more?

Every hour or two, day and night, I did my best to get liquid and food into Melissa

I’m very familiar with the symptoms of dehydration in cats because my cat, Violet, had been in renal failure for the last 2 years of her life.  Violet had lived to be nearly 18 without needing subcutaneous fluids, taking several droppers full of electrolytes each day.

To succeed with Melissa, I had to get past her clamped jaw so she would swallow some liquid.

Would it be enough?

When cats become dehydrated, they exhibit some very clear symptoms.  The one I kept closest watch on was the Pinch Test.

  • Normally, when you pinch the skin at the back of a cat’s neck, it should immediately rebound.
  • If it moves slowly back, there is some dehydration.
  • If it doesn’t return to normal, dehydration is severe and this is a RED ALERT situation!  Subcutaneous fluids are needed immediately to avoid death.

The Danger of Not Eating Had to Be Defeated.

Adult cats cannot go without food for more than 3 days without their livers starting to collapse.  I don’t know what the timing is for kittens, but I was very aware of this deadline.  Melissa had eaten before leaving the cattery on Friday morning, and somehow I had to get her to eat on her own.

The cattery had provided specific information about what they had fed the kittens, and I had purchased the canned food, but not the dry food.

When I first spoke with Cary on Saturday, she told me Melissa really liked the dry food, so out I ran to Stop and Shop where they sold it.  Melissa only ate a few pieces.

On Sunday, I was still desperate to get Melissa to eat.  Cary suggested Greek Yogurt.  Back to Stop & Shop I went.  Melissa ate only 2 or 3 licks.

I was still giving electrolytes and water by dropper every hour or two, and I was still putting bits of canned food into her mouth which she was spitting out.

Two things happened on Monday morning that saved Melissa from a trip to a vet clinic.

1- I called the office of Dr. Charles Loops, an experienced homeopathic veterinarian in North Carolina where I was already a client.  I requested and received emergency assistance.

Dr. Loops said to use Ignatia at 1M potency – that the 30C was far too weak.

This had an immediate dramatic effect on Melissa.  It began shifting her out of her state of grief and trauma, and made her more interested in eating and drinking.

Regarding homeopathy:  It’s been my experience that when you give the correct homeopathic remedy, an animal or human will often sleep for a bit as the remedy begins to work.  Melissa went into a relaxed sleep with the very first dose.  When she woke up, she was better than I had seen her since she had arrived and showed actual interest in food and water.

Ignatia 1M became the remedy I used with Melissa over the coming weeks with enormous success.  She continued to improve with each dose.

2- Cary Hansen suggested I offer Melissa raw chicken breast.  I feed raw chicken to my cats anyway, so I plenty on hand.  I just warmed up and pureed some.

Melissa immediately ate some chicken with relish.  This was a big turning point.  I could now add electrolytes directly into the food until she no longer needed them.  Melissa was on the road to recovery at last!

The Miracle That Is Starlight

Starlight grooming.

My feline heroine!

Throughout the weekend and into the following weeks, Starlight was amazing.

I was able to count on her to be supportive and totally cooperative and helpful.

She never minded how much time I was spending with the kitten and how much less time she was having with me.

She never minded that I smelled from another cat, a stranger, who smelled very different from the Melissa she and I had previously known.

She never sat outside the door of Melissa’s room yowling or hissing or carrying on in any way, something some other cats would have done.

She never even tried to get into the room when I delivered bowls of water or anything else to Melissa.  She would be there with me out of feline curiosity, but respected that it wasn’t time for her to meet Melissa.

Starlight has always been a great blessing, a great friend, a terrific companion to me in many lifetimes.  No matter what physical form Starlight has chosen when she’s with me, I have always been able to count on her.  I am enormously grateful.

SUCCESS at last!

By the end of the first week, Melissa was eating and drinking on her own, playing a bit, and exploring her private space.

Melissa playing with a rag toy.

Infinite gratitude and appreciation to:

Karen Nowak and Leslie Russell,
dear friends who supported me through this critical time.

Dr. Doug Shar from Indian Spring Cats,
who provided such an excellent place where Melissa could return.

 Cary Hansen, Dr. Shar’s assistant,
who brought Melissa to me, and whose advice helped me get Melissa to eat and drink.

Golda and Choco, Melissa’s beautiful and loving parents.

Dr. Charles Loops and staff, who responded quickly to my call for help.

My beloved Starlight, who was a complete angel throughout.

Melissa, who bravely reincarnated to be with Starlight and me once again.

There’s more to the saga of Melissa.
Look for the next installment coming soon.

Melissa Returns: A Difficult Beginning

 

A New Body.  A New Life Plan.

by Nedda Wittels
Copyright © 2022

Melissa photo from cattery.

Melissa 9 weeks old. Photo by Indian Spring Cattery, VA.

I expected to wait for months and months for Melissa to reincarnate.  In fact, I had asked Melissa to wait until February, 2022.  Being Melissa, she hadn’t said she would do that, but she also didn’t say “no” to my request.  Still, when the email with the photo arrived in early December, I was surprised.

Starlight and I had gotten into a very comfortable rhythm in our life together since Melissa had been euthanized in August, 2021.  Although I wanted Melissa to come back, I was willing to give Starlight as much time as she needed to explore being an only cat.

Then on Tuesday, December 7, 2021, I received an email from Indian Spring Cattery in Virginia.  I had contacted the breeder, Dr. Doug Schar, in early October, explaining that I expected my friend in spirit, Melissa, to return, and that she had told me she had found a breeding female at his cattery that she wanted for a mother.

I also explained I was a professional Animal Communicator, and that I’d recognize her from a photo.  It would be a female kitten, a Tonkinese.

To my amazement, Dr. Schar was completely open to helping me find the returning Melissa, even with his rule about kittens going to people in the order in which they send in a deposit.  He had experienced a feline friend return to him, which made it easier for him to understand my situation.

The circumstances surrounding this kitten were interesting.   She was supposed to go to a family that had suddenly decided to move and couldn’t take her.  Clearly, the Soul or Spirit of Melissa must have had advanced information, otherwise, why take this body if it meant ending up somewhere else?

Human reactions can be complex and complicated.  I took one look at the photo, and burst into tears and sobs.  Clearly my heart had instantly recognized her.  Meanwhile, my mind was telling me this couldn’t possibly be Melissa.  So for the first 24 hours, my mind and my heart were in this strange dance.

Once I accepted my heart’s knowledge as “truth,” I had more challenges to address.  I, myself, couldn’t go to Virginia to pick up the kitten.  Fortunately, there was an unexpected, miraculous solution.

Cary Hanson, Dr. Shar’s assistant, was coming to Connecticut by Amtrak on Friday, December 10, to visit family.  If this was Melissa, all I had to do was to meet them at New Haven’s Amtrak station that Friday evening, and the kitten would be delivered into my arms.

I spent the rest of the week organizing for Melissa’s arrival.  I can’t remember now everything I did, but here are just a few of the things I do recall.

  • Set up the St. Bernard-size dog crate to contain the kitten.
  • Kitten-proof the room — not a small task.
  • Buy everything she needed, especially the food she had been weaned onto, the litter she’d was accustomed to, toys for a baby kitten, and more.
  • I had to make sure that Starlight was going to be OK with the sudden return of Melissa.
  • Find someone to drive me to New Haven on a Friday evening.  I can’t drive safely at night, nor on interstate highways.

I said many prayers that all would come together in Divine Right timing.

I’m very lucky, graced, in fact, to have some amazing friends who were eager to help and who considered a trip to New Haven to get a kitten a fun adventure.

With great excitement we arrived in New Haven with time to spare, and then had to wait several hours due to train delays.  When Cary finally arrived, she climbed into my friends’ car and we moved a kitten from one carrier to another and took care of all the paper work.

It was a 2 hours drive back to my house.  Melissa had been on the road since about 10 a.m. that morning and we got home close to midnight.  She hadn’t eaten or used the litter box since leaving the cattery.

When I took her out of the carrier, I noticed that she was wet.  She was drooling.  She was limp and not very responsive.  Clearly, she was traumatized.

I put her into the litter box, but she just seemed dazed.  Fortunately, she did urinate.

I offered her water and food, but she wouldn’t eat or drink. This was not a good sign.

Holding her and stroking her and speaking softly to her didn’t elicit any reaction.

I placed her into the warm and soft cat cave I had ready for her, and she just lay there, completely limp.

Because I’m a strong emotional empath, I could feel her overwhelming grief, loss, confusion, and terror.

I already had sprayed the room with Rescue Remedy, and I put some on Melissa.  I had ordered Feliway, but it hadn’t yet arrived.

I managed to get a few drops of water into her mouth, despite her jaws being clamped shut.

For the next 3 days, I struggled to get food, water, and electrolytes into a kitten who was completely overwhelmed and who seemed not to recognize me.

Crate with litter box, cave, and food.

Melissa’s safe space.

Infinite gratitude and appreciation to:

Bob and Nishanto Kane,
dear friends drove me to New Haven to get Melissa.

There’s more to the saga of Melissa.
Look for the next installment coming soon.

 

Starlight on Her Own.

 

Transitioning From Many Cats to Just One.
Copyright © Nedda Wittels, 2022
As written by Starlight and Nedda.

Starlight, Siamese, groowming.

Nedda:

I started writing this post, and then had the thought, “Starlight should be the one to write this.”  And then realized that Starlight was, in fact, asking to write it.  After all, it is her story, her experience.  So my job here is to translate into the written word what Starlight wants to share.

Starlight:

Missing Melissa

When Melissa died [“Melissa: A Challenging Life”], I was very sad and lonely.  Of course, I had Nedda for company, but Melissa and I had a very special, loving, feline relationship, and for the first time, there were no other cats in my life.

There was no one to groom me or for me to groom, although I sometimes groomed Nedda’s head while she lay in bed, and she daily groomed me with a very luscious brush.

Starlight and Melissa cuddling.

Me and Melissa cuddling.

Nedda and I grieved together, which means we supported each other, cuddled each other, and reassured each other.  I spent more time in Nedda’s lap each day than I ever had before.  Was that for her?  For me?  For both of us!  It felt great to just jump up and not have someone else objecting or trying to get into her lap at the same time.

Purring helped us both, too.  Purring is a healing sound, and Nedda even began trying to purr.  I know she really can’t, but I appreciated her efforts, and the sound she was able to make was very comforting to both of us.

I love to sit on Nedda’s meditation seat because the energy is so lovely.

At first, what I found most strange about being the only cat was that I could go anywhere in the house, sit anywhere, lie down anywhere, and no one would challenge me to move or to give up my spot.  I felt my body start to unwind some of the tension that it held from being growled at or hit on the head because Someone Else wanted me to acknowledge her dominance.

Another big change was that I could jump in Nedda’s lap many times a day and I didn’t have to wait my turn or share it with anyone else.  It felt just right – perfect for me to be there.

At night, for the first time ever, I could crawl under the covers with Nedda whenever I chose.  This was very new.  The dominant cats had always taken that position on the bed.  I wasn’t  certain how to lie down under the covers. 

Should my feet be against Nedda’s body, or my back? 

Would Nedda role over on me while she slept? 

Did I need to have my claws ready to remind her I was there?

I had never been able to work this out before because first Violet, and later Melissa, always insisted on being in the spot I might have wanted.  Now it was just me, and I had to figure it all out.

Soon I found the best position for me, and totally relaxed into it.  Nedda relaxed more, too, and these were some of the best cuddles of my life.

Similarly, eating was different.  No one tried to eat out of my bowl, and Nedda and I would dine together, just the two of us. 

Nedda was concerned that I might be lonely, and asked several times about getting another cat, but she and I both understood that I was exploring and needed time to do that. 

Who am I really?  What do I like as a cat?

Can I allow my energy to fill the entire house and feel comfortable with that?

Suddenly, I realized that I could be myself.  I could use my voice more and no one would tell me to “shut up.”  In fact, Nedda kept saying, “I love to hear your voice.  Keep on singing.” and I began singing more.  I discovered I could make a wider range of sounds than I had since my first weeks as a kitten.  Nedda listened and encouraged me to sing more and more and more.  It was fun!

Melissa and I used to go outside together and with Nedda.  Melissa ran and ran.  I sometimes ran, but I really like to sit and watch – birds, squirrels, chipmunks, moles, butterflies, bees – and even Melissa. 

Now, there was only Nedda and me.  We took some walks around the yard, but it wasn’t the same.

Climbing Trees?  Who, me?

Melissa used to do the strangest things.  She’d climb trees – really big trees – way high up.  [About 10-12 feet.]  I couldn’t believe my eyes the first time she did that.  I kept wondering, “How will she get down?”  But Melissa somehow knew how to wrap herself around the trunk of the tree and to use her hind feet with her front feet to return safely to the ground.

Melissa also wasn’t afraid to jump down from a very high place.  Jumping down had always stumped me.  Nedda says it’s a horse thing, and she’s probably right that I still have horsey characteristics.

So I began trying to get up my courage to climb a little ways up tree trunks.  I’d make a big run towards a tree to get lots of energy, and go as high as I dared, which wasn’t any higher than I felt safe to jump down.  [About 4 feet most of the time; 6 feet once. ]  Nedda always kindly cheered me on for my efforts.  But I knew that I’d never climb as high as Melissa, and that Nedda loves me just as I am.

So after Melissa died, I did try climbing a bit, but the inspiration was gone and while Nedda and I had fun picking up branches and playing outside, I preferred to sit quietly and watch other animals.  The squirrels were particularly insulting about me having given up, but squirrels can be very rude and I just ignored them.

I began to feel and more myself – my very own self – not having to compromise who I am for anyone else.  It was a very good feeling.  I felt myself growing and growing inside, expanding and letting go of restrictions I had accepted to make sure other cats would love and accept me.

I’m not a hunter, and never will be.

Then there was the issue of “mousing,” as Nedda calls it.

Two cats looking under a table at a mouse.

Melissa and me hunting a mouse in the house in the wee hours of the morning.

When I chose to be a cat in this life, I knew that it might be expected of me to hunt and kill rodents, birds, and insects.  After all, that’s part of being a cat, right?  But killing has always felt wrong to me in many lifetimes.  I knew a cat has to eat meat, but I also knew I couldn’t, wouldn’t kill.

Melissa and I would hunt as a team to chase down any rodent who came (or whom Melissa brought) into the house.  I had to admit it was fun to work together to catch the rodent, and to play with it with my paws.

Melissa took this very seriously, and taught me how to pay attention to where the rodent had hidden and to what she was doing all at the same time.  She’d tell me where to look, where to go to block an exit, and how to synchronize my movements with hers.  She was a patient teacher, and never admonished me when I made a mistake.

Red squirrels are very fierce and very fast, but Melissa managed to kill one. Nedda was impressed.

Melissa and I would play with the animal, taking turns, and then finally, Melissa would either kill the rodent or, on rare occasions, let it go.  When she killed it, she’d nearly always eat some or all of the body.  She especially liked to eat their heads.  Once or twice, she let me eat a baby mole she had killed.  It tasted a bit weird, but still good.  I’ve always liked to try out new foods.

I once caught a large insect Nedda calls a dragon fly.  It was in the autumn, and the insect was dying.  I brought it to Nedda, who took it from me and set it somewhere to have a peaceful death.  I was happy to have brought her a gift because Melissa had brought her so many gifts of animals she had caught.

Now that Melissa was gone, Nedda asked me to hunt on my own.  This seemed like a ridiculous request on her part.  Me?  Hunt?  Alone?  Really?  What are you thinking?

I was sitting in my favorite spot just outside the garage watching squirrels one day when Nedda called me from the porch.  “Starlight.  There’s a chipmunk on the porch.” she called.

I ran onto the enclosed porch and Nedda pointed towards a pile of boxes.  “I saw a chipmunk run back there.” Nedda told me.

I could smell it, so I began a search for it.  But at the same time, I said to Nedda, “I’m not going to kill it.”

“Fine,” Nedda replied.  “Just chase it out.  Scare it off.  You don’t need to kill, but I’d appreciate if you’d keep the rodents away from the house.” 

Nedda turned to go back inside.

“Where are you going?” I asked her. suddenly feeling overwhelmed by the prospect of hunting alone.  “I’m used to working as a team.  You have to help.” I pleaded with her.

“Starlight,” she answered, “I can’t smell it, and I’m too big to fit into the places the chipmunk can go.”

I stopped what I was doing and turned towards her.  “You really can’t smell it?  What’s wrong with your nose?  Is your nose working correctly?”

Nedda sighed.  “Human noses are not as sensitive as cat noses.  I just can’t smell it enough to find out where it is.”

“How sad,” I told her.  And I meant it.  What a poor nose to miss all these powerful smells.

By this time, the chipmunk had made it’s escape. 

I took Nedda’s request seriously and began spending some time in the evening and at night in the places where mice liked to come into the house.  I would tell them:  “This is a mouse-free zone.  Mice are not welcome here.  I will wack you very hard if I get the chance.” 

I think they heard me, because I didn’t see very many of them as the weather turned colder and winter approached.

What if Melissa wants to return?

The day after Melissa’s death, she came to visit us in her spirit form.  She was so very different, so peaceful and so clear.  She and I talked, and she and Nedda talked. 

Melissa told me she was very happy and free, and wanted to return as a cat at some point.  Was I OK with that?  Of course I said, “Yes, I would love you to come back.”

Two cats: Starlight grooming Melissa

I missed the special times.

Nedda told me she had a similar conversation with Melissa, and that she had also said, “Yes” to Melissa’s request to return.  Nedda wanted to know if I was OK with that, and I certainly was.

We had no idea when this would happen, and Nedda and I weren’t in a rush.  We left it up to Melissa.

As I began to get more in touch with who I am and how I want to be in this life, it became clear to me that being alone was a good thing for me.  I realized I wasn’t in any hurry for there to be another cat in the house.  Melissa was still welcome, but if she took 6 months or a year, that would be OK with me.

Nedda, on the other hand, was grieving so deeply.  She kept looking at photos online of rescued cats.  I could feel she was hoping to see Melissa there, but mostly she just saw photos of very sad, very unhappy abandoned cats who needed to have love poured into them.  One or two even looked a bit like Melissa.  I think it just made her sadder when she did this.

As I began to change, Nedda realized how much she and I needed time alone together.  We were really enjoying each other and it was a very special and precious time that we hadn’t had before.  Everything was put on hold . . . well, sort of everything. 

Nedda began looking at websites of Thai Tonkinese breeders, Melissa’s favorite breed.  It was like she was wishing Melissa back into a body.  I know that can’t happen because I’ve been between incarnations, and it’s not up to those already incarnated to decide on anything about someone else’s return.

Melissa would visit us in her spirit form and she and Nedda would talk about various catteries and what the cats looked like and whether the energy there felt right for Melissa, and other considerations.  I mainly stayed out of it.

But I could see/feel Nedda’s longing.  It didn’t make me feel less loved, but I knew that Nedda really needed Melissa to return.  So when it happened, I wasn’t very surprised.  But it did feel too soon for me.  That’s the honest truth.

Nedda:

In transcribing this for Starlight, I’ve made extra effort not to modify or change the essence, feeling, meaning, or thoughts that she wants to share, regardless of how it might make me appear.  This is truly Starlight’s story, and I hope you can feel/sense her beauty and love as it pours through my fingers into this post.

There’s more to the saga of Melissa.

Look for the next installment coming soon.

Melissa: A Challenging Life

 

Clearing Multiple Lifetimes of Karma in a Single Life
Copywrite © Nedda Wittels, 2022

A beautiful portrait of Melissa.

Melissa came into my current life in the fall of 2015. She was already 6 months old.  She brought with her many challenges – for me, for herself, and for Starlight, my Siamese, who was 2 and a half at the time.

Melissa brought 11 or 12 lifetimes of horrendous experiences and deaths, many that I had caused or participated in in some way.  In some she had been a feline living with me; in others my human child.  All this karma weighed heavily on her, like a soggy thick wool blanket.

I don’t know all the stories, but enough to know that she and I had much karma to resolve between us.

Melissa carried much deep-seated anger and rage from those past lives, as well as from having waited 6 months for me to show up in her current life.   From her perspective, she had lost out on her kittenhood with me.  And she arrived in a household with two elderly cats who were had health issues requiring a lot of attention, as well as Starlight, to whom I was very close.

In addition to all that, Melissa’s biological parents had been filled with vaccinations from their importation process.  Whatever is in the parents affects the offspring, and for Melissa this contributed to the disaster which plagued her later on.

When she finally came to my home, Melissa was reluctant to speak telepathicaly with me about much of anything.  She refused to tell me her name and made until I somehow guessed it.  She was difficult for me to hear telepathically.  When I tried to explain things, she would send me an image of herself with her paws in her ears:  “I’m not listening.”  She would also send images of a rebel teenager leaning against a wall with a smug, superior expression on his face, refusing to cooperate with anyone.

In a fit of anger one day, Melissa broke out of the house by tearing a hole in a sliding screen door.  I thought she was running away and wouldn’t return.  My house backs up to some woods, and her color blended in perfectly.  Fortunately, 45 minutes later, she returned calmer and more relaxed than I had ever seen her.  This showed me that she needed to be allowed outside to get grounded and more peaceful.

Melissa looking out a window.

Even as a kitten, Melissa would climb up to look out high windows.

At first I resisted letting Melissa go out whenever she wanted to go.  We would metaphorically knock heads together on a regular basis about this and many other things.  We were both strong minded, controlling, and stubborn.  It was very challenging working things out with her.   I learned to compromise … and compromise …and compromise.  She often agreed to something and then did as she pleased – a typical rebellious teenager mentality.

Usually Melissa would stay outside in or near the yard, but she soon began exploring further and further away from the yard, establishing territory.  She was a fierce hunter, and one of my neighbors was delighted that she kept the chipmunks out of his vegetable garden.  She not only killed and ate chipmunks, but also moles, squirrels, mice, and birds.  I gave up having a bird feeder in the winter to protect them from her ability to jump straight up 4+ feet in the air and knock them to the ground in one swift movement.

Another Layer of Challenge – The Injury

Melissa would usually go out for a short time and then come back and “check in,” and then head back out.  So the day she was gone for 7 hours, I was concerned.  Still, she was so smart and filled with the natural instinct of the feral cat who knows how to survive in the wild.  All day I kept speaking to her telepathically asking her come home, and all she would say was, “I’m coming.”

When Melissa finally showed up, it was clear that all was not right with her.  She would take about 10 steps and then stop and rest.  Then 10 more steps, and then stop.  She refused my offer to pick her up and carry her.

I let her into the house and she continued — 10 steps at a time — all the way through the living room and up the stairs, finally jumping onto my bed (which she thought of her bed, of course).  There I discovered that both her hind legs were badly injured.  One had bled quite a bit while the other was just missing some skin.  There was no more bleeding, and the wounds were clean.

Fortunately, I knew what to do and fortunately, she let me do it.  Picking her put very gently, I sprinkle some warm water on her legs rinse off her injuries.  Then I use Calendula gel, a homeopathic that disinfects, on her open wounds.  I placed a towel under her on my bed, where she clearly wanted to be.  But she wouldn’t drink water and she wouldn’t eat.

It had been a hot day and she should have been both thirsty and hungry.  She was exhausted and clearly in pain.  So pain was the next thing to be addressed.

I gave Melissa homeopathic Arnica, Ruta Graveolens, and Hypericum by dropper.  She started to relax a bit as these remedies are all pain relievers in addition to their other benefits for injuries.

Her back muscles were spasming and very tight.  I used TTouch (Tellington Touch) and unwinding techniques which encouraged her back to relax and release.

Then I gave her electrolytes by dropper and plain water by dropper.  After she had had enough of those, she was finally willing to drink on her own.  After that, she, ate some raw food from a bowl I held for her.

I put a litter box in my bedroom so Melissa could use it without going downstairs.  Being Melissa, she ignored it and insisted on going downstairs to use the other boxes, and then back upstairs to her spot on the bed.

Melissa did get treated by our holistic vet who checked the wounds and also did chiropractic.  As her body healed, I encouraged her to be more cautious, more careful.  She would never look before she jumped, and that clearly had been a factor in this injury.  Melissa was able to run and jump again, but never fully recovered her full flexibility and the height of her jumps was less than before.

How Melissa coped with pain.

Melissa watching a mouse.

A mouse is near the ceiling, and Melissa is keeping a close eye on it.

Melissa’s way of coping with emotional and physical pain was to ignore both as much as possible, spend time in nature hunting, and to run, and run, and run.  It wasn’t until after her passing that I realized how much chronic physical pain she must have been in, not just from the injury, but from chronic constipation she had developed as a kitten and which had gotten worse over time.

Some people and animals spend entire lifetimes running from pain, and that was what Melissa was doing.  Sadly, I didn’t realize all of this at the time, but perhaps I wasn’t meant to know the full extent of what was happening.

It wasn’t as tho’ I ignored Melissa’s physical and emotional problems.  I researched and did everything possible to turn things around for her, to make her more comfortable, to help her heal.  Some things aren’t meant to be “fixed” because the soul has to experience them to learn and to balance karma.  Nothing I did seemed to resolve her issues, although, as it turned out, everything I did helped on some deep level to let Melissa know she was dearly loved.

Melissa Became a Chronic Biter.

Melissa surrounded by toys.

Melissa surrounded by some favorite toys.

Two weeks after her rabies vaccination at 1 year of age, Melissa began biting me and drawing blood.  It took me 2 years to figure out that she was struggling with rabies vaccinosis.

When I’d ask Melissa why she bit me, she’d deny doing it.  This made me furious because I didn’t believe her.  It took me a long time to figure out that she really didn’t remember biting me.  She would be in a trance-like state whenever she bit and then not remember what she had done.

Some veterinarians insist there’s no such thing as vaccinosis, but Melissa was a classic case of rabies vaccinosis.  Her eyes would glaze over, her pupils dialated fully, and she’d attack without warning.  It didn’t matter whether she was playing, being petted, or just sitting quietly.  The attacks seemed to come out of nowhere.  Because they were unpredictable, I became more and more on guard around her.

I didn’t ignore this situation.  I tried everything possible to resolve this issue, as I also did with her constipation difficulties.  Every alternative treatment that I thought might resolve these problems were attempted with the best people I could find.  Hundreds of treatments, not just one or two here and there were given to Melissa.

She had shamanic soul retrievals and shamanic healings.  She had homeopathic treatments.  She had acupuncture and chiropractic, Theta Healing, Emotion Code and Body Code.  Prayers was invoked.  Multidimensional Energy Healing sessions were given.  This went on for 5 years.

Slowly Melissa improved in many ways.  But time was running out.  The Ascension energies kept raising the frequencies higher and faster, and higher and faster shifts and Stargate openings seemed to make things more and more difficult for Melissa.  She was making her best effort to control her behavior, and failing again and again.

By the time Melissa was 6 years old, she was attacking me more and more often.  In 2021, the Lion’s Gate Portal in August brought things to a peak.  Neither Melissa nor I could continue to live this way.  She was trying her best to control her behavior, but couldn’t.  And I couldn’t handle being bitten frequently, especially after one time when I became so depressed that I didn’t treat my wounds and they became infected.

The Only Option Left Was Euthanasia

Over the 5 and a half years that Melissa was with me, I had grown to deeply love her. When I would be furious with her, I could see that she was a powerful reflection of me – my issues – my ways of coping with life.

I didn’t want to euthanize her because it felt like killing her again, repeating past karma instead of healing it.  But there were no other options.

I faced a huge ethical and moral dilemma.  I couldn’t turn her loose in the woods because she wouldn’t survive the winters and the abandonment would be devastating emotionally.  I couldn’t give her to someone else because her biting was dangerous.  Starlight loved her.  I loved her.  She loved us.  I wrestled with this for all the years she was here.

On the August 8, 2021 Lions Gate weekend, it all came to a head.  Fortunately, a dear friend and powerful psychic healer convinced me that Melissa really wanted to leave her body.  She couldn’t tolerate being here any more.  Melissa was in a great deal of physical and emotional pain.  She really did need to go back into spirit.

I asked Melissa if she really wanted to go back into spirit.  She told me that she was emotionally exhausted and ready to leave.  It was a summer Sunday evening, and Melissa liked to go out at dusk, just the time I preferred she’d be inside.  But that evening, I told her she could go, and if she wanted to leave with the help of a wild animal, I was certain she could call on one to help her.

Melissa left the house and everything became very, very quiet.  It felt like she had pulled all her energy in and I couldn’t feel her presence at all.  Starlight felt the same way.  I stayed up very late because I didn’t want Melissa to return and be locked out of the house.  By 10 p.m. she was back, all her energy still contained around her.  She wanted a gentle death, and that’s what I would give her the following day.

Euthanizing Melissa was the most difficult euthanasia I have ever had to do.  I knew it was the right thing to do.  I knew she was ready.  She told me and showed me that this was what she wanted and needed – a gently, loving passage back into spirit, not some trauma induced death.

I called the next morning and made the appointment for euthanasia.  About 15 minutes before we were to leave the house, Melissa jumped onto the sofa next to Starlight.  They sat quietly for a few minutes talking.  And then they started to say goodbye by grooming each other so lovingly, so tenderly that I could hardly hold the camera steady.  When they were finished, Melissa got into the cat carrier and we left.

Melissa’s body was buried in the woods behind my house the following day.

I grieved, and grieved, and grieved.  Starlight grieved with me for a few weeks, but for me this was releasing lifetimes and lifetimes of pain, and my grieving seemed endless.  I sobbed and sobbed for hours … days … weeks … months.  I couldn’t talk about this, nor could I write about it.  It was coming from so deep within me that I just needed to experience the grief and let it go as much as possible, and trust that, over time, I would heal.

There’s more to the saga of Melissa.

Look for the next installment coming soon.

 

Help an Injured Wild Animal with Animal Communication, Flower Essences, and More.

Chickdee on a branch.

 

Helping a wild animal who is injured may be a daunting task, especially when you’re not sure what to do.

I once had some roofers at my home putting some gooey tar-based stuff on part of my roof.  A beautiful little bird got stuck in the tar before it dried, and couldn’t free itself.

The roofers were kind enough to get the bird down,   The bird was terrified, and although it could still breathe, it literally died of fear as it lay in my hands, it’s wings stuck to it’s body.

Later on, when I was able to think clearly, I realized that Bach Rescue Remedy (FES Brand:  5 Flower Formula) might have calmed the bird enough to keep it alive longer to get it some help.  I later learned that that Dawn dish liquid is used to remove oil-based substances from wild animals.

Sometimes, all you can do is pray for the animal’s spirit to be taken peacefully and very gently put loving energy around them.

Kittens ourside.A wild kitten crawled into my yard once to die after being hit by a car.

She kept crawling away as I tried to get near her, so I stopped doing that.

Instead, I put peaceful loving energy around her until her spirit was ready to lift off.

I made sure her guides were there, and that she was helped on her way.

Being able to telepathically talk to a wild animal who is injured is valuable, although when the animal is terrified, it may not be able to hear you very well.

Here are some things I recommend doing with flower essences and telepathic communication:

  • Take Rescue Remedy (5 Flower Formula) yourself.    Take as much as you need to get yourself calm.
  • Focus on your breathing until it is slow and calm.
  • Channel the energy of Rescue Remedy to the animal.  To do this, hold the bottle in your hands, connect with the energy, and allow it to flow out your heart chakra and around the energy field of the animal.  Let the animal take in as much as it wants.
  • Softly and gently send simple telepathic messages.  Long complex thoughts will not be easily understood by a panicked, terrified animal in pain.  Send only simple words, feelings, and images.  Keep repeating them over and over, as you are guided to do so.

Calm  …  Peace  …  Safety  …   Help  …  Trust  ….

  • If you plan to capture the animal to take it to a rescue for wildlife, let the animal know that you are bringing it to a safe place where it can be helped.

I recently read an interesting article on what to do when you find injured wildlife and want to help.  There’s a fair amount of important information in the article.  Here’s the link for The Ultimate Wildlife Rescue Guide.  If you put the information from that guide together with telepathic communication and Rescue Remedy (or 5 Flower Formula), you’ll be able to help many animals in the wild.

Swan sitting in a nest.

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