A New Way to Have Fun with Animal Communication

by

Starlight

Starlight in cat tree playing with blue balloon.

Starlight to birthday balloon, “Come back here.

While I was playing, I had a new idea.

What if everyone who wanted to practice talking to animals could enter to win prizes?

Would that get more people to practice?

Sometimes it’s hard to get humans to do things you want them to do.  They’re so busy and they forget to have fun.

I have this problem with Nedda sometimes.   I have to insist that she stop and play.

So I was playing, and then it happened!

I had a brilliant idea!

I know it was brilliant because Nedda got all excited when I told her.

What if we gave prizes to

people who practiced

Animal Communication?

Wouldn’t people have fun?

Wouldn’t the animals they talk to have fun?

Starlight in a box getting ready to pounce.

Maybe I can catch that balloon if I sneak up on it.

Wouldn’t I have more fun than anyone because I would have lots more people to talk to?

So Nedda and I named it …

Starlight’s

“Speak-with-Animals”

Giveaway

There are 3 exciting prizes.  Each prize will help a human improve their animal communication skills.

And the best part … each person who wants to win has to speak with 3 different animals at SPEAK! GOOD HUMAN during the month of August.

So that means that the animals will benefit, too.

There are animals waiting right now to speak with you and help you enter my Giveaway.

You’ll find them all (including me) at this website:

SPEAK! GOOD HUMAN
The free animal communication practice site.

There are hundreds of animals there waiting to speak with you.

All of them want to help you practice telepathic communication with animals.

All of them want you to get better and better at Animal Communication.

After you talk with 3 of them, you can submit your conversation notes to my Giveaway.

Nedda says I don’t have to tell you all the details of my Giveaway.

Just CLICK on this poster,
and you’ll go to the page with all the details.

 

Poster announcing Starlight's Giveaway.

Click on this poster for more information.

I’m waiting for you to come talk with me at

SPEAK! GOOD HUMAN.

Come visit me in our Practice Den.

Purrurururur.

Starlight.

Starlight in cat tree with all 3 balloons.

Starlight with all 3 balloons.

An Extraordinary Animal Communication Experience

Why would a wild bird follow a dog?

The bird on the fence is following a dog.

This bird is following a dog all around her yard.

Dog standing in the garden near the fence.

This is Suzi, the dog the bird is following.

After completing my new course offering, the TWA-I DO Communicate teleseries in Animal Communication, Donna Emerson had an extraordinary experience.

Here Donna tells it in her own words.

We moved into this home a year ago.

The backyard is large and rectangular. There is a fence along the perimeter. Along the fence are many bushes, vines and flowers. Suzi’s favorite thing to do is to find and chase lizards.

What I noticed about two weeks ago is that a California Towhee was flying from one spot on the fence to another chirping while following Suzi.

This bird would always show up, when Suzi was in the yard, always chirping at her.

The bird sits on a fence post.

The bird came whenever Suzi was in the yard, always chirping at her.

When I would take Suzi around the block the Towhee would end up on the roof of the house behind us chirping at Suzi.

I finally asked the bird if it knew Suzi in another life. It said “Yes.”

I then saw a place with a lot of snow and pine trees. The Towhee told me that she was a hawk and Suzi was her baby.

I expressed how wonderful that was.  Then Suzi chimed in with “until I fell out of the nest.”.

The two birds visit Suzi.

The two birds visit Suzi.

The communication stopped at that point. I will be doing more talking with them.

Yesterday my friend saw Suzi lying on the patio watching this Towhee and its bird friend walk around her.

[Suzie] use to chase the birds, but she doesn’t chase these..

What I especially love about Donna’s experience is that the behavior of her dog, Suzi, and of the Towhee support the messages that she received.

So often when we speak telepathically with wild animals, we have no way to get confirmation.

In this situation, Suzie’s acceptance of the presence of the Towhee is a strong indication that there is a special relationship between the bird and Suzie.

And who ever heard of a  wild bird following a dog around it’s yard?

Confirmation is not always possible when speaking telepathically with animals, even when the animals live with us as part of our family.

The desire for confirmation is something that I tell my students to put aside.  If you’re going to worry about whether or not you’re receiving accurate information, your telepathic abilities will become blocked by the strong emotional energy of worry.

Instead, be spontaneous!  Communicate in the moment and go with whatever you get.

Assume that what you receive is true until you discover otherwise.  That’s the best way to learn telepathic communication with animals.

Suzie and the bird on the fence enjoying the yard together.

Suzie and the bird in the yard together.

Reaching Out to Animals at Home While You Travel

You wish you could take him with you,

Photo by Daniel Cano on Unsplash

He sure looks like he’s missing you.*

But sometimes they have to stay behind.

It’s really hard to travel when your animal family can’t come along.

The good news is that you don’t have to be completely separated while on vacation or a business trip.

Animal Communication works very well whether you’re sitting with your animal, or whether the two of you are separated by thousands of miles.

The summer vacation season is about to start and your animals may be wondering whether their family will disappear again this year.

Do you tell them your plans for your vacation?

How long will you be away?

Do you tell them how they will spend the time when you’re away?

Who will take care of them?

How soon you’ll return?

Animals do better mentally, emotionally, and sometimes even physically when they know what the plans are.

Because they love you, they want to know about your trip, too.

Where are you going?

What will you do there?

When will you return?

Will you think about me while you’re gone?

Most of our animals know that we need a vacation sometimes, but if they can’t be on the trip with you, they’ll feel more included when you share the details.

And it reassures them to know about the arrangements you’ve made for them while you’re gone.

Setting expectations reduces or eliminates

any anxiety or stress they may be feeling.

You can certainly tell them these things yourself, but unless you’ve learned Animal Communication, they might not understand everything and won’t  get to ask the questions that concern them most.

Once you’re on the trip, you can still arrange a professional Animal Communication session if you need one.

 

  • A check-in while you’re on a long trip may be a good idea.
  • If a crisis occurs delaying your return or affecting your animal’s well-being, a professional Animal Communicator can speak with you by phone and talk to you animal telepathically even while you’re still traveling.

Photo by Karina Vorozheeva on Unsplash

Cats rarely get to travel with their family. **

One of my clients had a situation arise just recently while she was traveling.

My client was on a business trip in the USA and her cat was home in The Netherlands.  The cat’s in his teens and has some health issues.

My client left him in excellent care, but a heat wave in The Netherlands affected his overall health situation.

What a relief my client and her cat both felt when I did a session for them allowing them to speak with each other through me.

It reassured and comforted both of them.

So keep in mind that when you travel, connection with your animals is as close as a phone call to an Animal Communicator professional.

* * * * *

* Photo by Daniel Cano on Unsplash

** Photo by Karina Vorozheeva on Unsplash

Telepathic Broadcast Part 2

May 30, 2018 by  
Filed under Animal Communication, In the Wild, New Posts

The Universe Answered.

Melissa, the Hunter

If you remember my post, “Telepathic Broadcast,” published on April 25, 2015, I asked the Universe to send me a feline hunter to live in my yard and keep the rodents under control.

Hattie had left her body, my yard was full of chipmunks, and there were mice in the house.

I thought for a long time that the universe hadn’t answered my request at all.

I was mistaken.

Melissa was born on April 24, 2015.  It has taken her a few years to mature into her role as hunter and guardian of our home.

It has also taken until just a few moment ago for me to recognize that Melissa meets all the requirements I set, even tho’ she lives inside with me and Starlight.

During last winter, she perfected her mousing skills indoors.

This spring, she perfected her chipmunk hunting skills outside.  She proudly brings one home nearly every day that she goes out.

I think of her like the Roman Goddess, Diana, and the Greek Goddess, Artemis.   According to Crystalinks.com

[Diana was] the goddess of the hunt and moon and birthing, being associated with wild animals and woodland, and having the power to talk to and control animals. She was equated with the Greek goddess Artemis, though she had an independent origin in Italy.

Melissa is a formidable hunter, focused, persistent, and able to move quicker than a blink.

While some of you may not be comfortable with cats that hunt, hunting is their natural way of being in the 3-D energies in which we’ve all been living.

Melissa is reluctant to move into higher vibrations, although she is clearing up many lifetimes of old stuff.  After all, she chose to be here with me, so she must, at some level, be on a spiritual path.

But for now, I have my magnificent feline hunter, and she is quite adept at her job!

I thank Melissa for being here for a multitude of reasons.

I thank the universe for answering my request, even if it took me 3 years to recognize that my request had been answered.

Tips for Litter Box Management

Meeting Simple Feline Standards

Would this box be large enough for a family of 2 or  3 cats?

Because cats really do care about the location, size, smell, and cleanliness of their litter boxes, it is important to provide a toilet facility that meets their standards.

Cats like to be clean. Since cats have to climb into a litter box and will get the odor of whatever is in the box onto their fur, they prefer to enter a box that is clean. If you have been getting away with a less than perfectly clean box and your cats are not protesting, then you have been very lucky.

Also, since cats lick themselves to bathe, and since they prefer to be clean, cats will be ingesting some of whatever you use for their litter. For health and other reasons, this should be an important consideration.

The most important thing to remember is that changes in an animal’s behavior are indications of a problem. Animals do not suddenly change their behavior for no reason. When it comes to litter boxes, the first thing a change in behavior might indicate is a health problem.

While each cat is a unique individual and has unique preferences and tolerances, here are some simple litter box tips that may be helpful to you and your cat(s).

 

The Family Litterbox.  Not everyone looks happy.

THE BOX

1. Make sure the box is large enough for the cat. A box that fits a kitten well might become too small for the same cat as an adult. Adult cats come in a variety of sizes, so keep that in mind as well.

2. “Location . . . location . . . location” – not just a slogan for real estate. Put litter boxes in places that are easy for each cat to get into and out of without being trapped or jumped on by other felines in the house. Also, choose a location that is just plain easy for a cat to use.

3. The recommended number of boxes to have is 1 for each cat + 1 more. This may not be necessary if you have only 1 or 2 cats, but as the number of felines goes up, this general rule becomes more important.

4. Plastic litter boxes eventually pick up the smell of urine. It is advisable to replace boxes every couple of years.

THE LITTER

1. Pick out the pee and poop a minimum of twice daily – more often if possible. Cats do not like to dig through urine and feces to “find a spot.”

2. Change the litter completely at least once a week, especially if you are not using a good quality clumping litter that is easy to pick out.

3. Choose a scent-free litter or one with a mild scent that is natural to the product of which the litter is made. Cats have a strong sense of smell and may not like having a chemical smell on their fur. This is also healthier for your cat, as the chemical gets on them and they ingest it when they groom.

4. Do not use chemicals or anything scented when you wash the box. Cat noses are much more sensitive than human noses, and if you use something that they don’t like to smell, they may stop using the box. Remember, also, that chemicals can be toxic, so use natural, safe products.

5. Some cats are very sensitive to the texture of the litter, especially if the cat has been declawed. A softer litter can increase a cat’s comfort even if it is not a clumping litter.

6. When changing to a new litter, it is best to mix the two litters together for a week or more. This gives your cats a chance to adjust to the new litter.

ELDER CATS

Some cats, as they age, develop arthritic problems in their backs and hind end. This may make it difficult for them to climb into a normal litter box. Here are some things you can do to help your senior citizen feline continue to use a litter box.

1. Try a cookie sheet as a litter tray so your elder cat can easily climb into it.

2. Some cats will adapt to “wee wee pads” while others still prefer to have litter in the cookie tray so they can cover their feces and urine.

3. A cardboard box can surround the tray with one end opened flat for easy access. This will minimize how much litter gets spread around due to the low sides of the cookie sheet. It will also keep the tray from moving around when the cat is using it, making it more comfortable for your cat to adapt.

* * * * *

For help with litter box problems, consider Animal Communication.  When we discover why your cat is not using the litter box, we have an opportunity to identify the underlying issue(s) and resolve them.  Contact Nedda at 860-651-5771 or neddaw@sbcglobal.net

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