Reaching Out to Animals at Home While You Travel

You wish you could take him with you,

Photo by Daniel Cano on Unsplash

He sure looks like he’s missing you.*

But sometimes they have to stay behind.

It’s really hard to travel when your animal family can’t come along.

The good news is that you don’t have to be completely separated while on vacation or a business trip.

Animal Communication works very well whether you’re sitting with your animal, or whether the two of you are separated by thousands of miles.

The summer vacation season is about to start and your animals may be wondering whether their family will disappear again this year.

Do you tell them your plans for your vacation?

How long will you be away?

Do you tell them how they will spend the time when you’re away?

Who will take care of them?

How soon you’ll return?

Animals do better mentally, emotionally, and sometimes even physically when they know what the plans are.

Because they love you, they want to know about your trip, too.

Where are you going?

What will you do there?

When will you return?

Will you think about me while you’re gone?

Most of our animals know that we need a vacation sometimes, but if they can’t be on the trip with you, they’ll feel more included when you share the details.

And it reassures them to know about the arrangements you’ve made for them while you’re gone.

Setting expectations reduces or eliminates

any anxiety or stress they may be feeling.

You can certainly tell them these things yourself, but unless you’ve learned Animal Communication, they might not understand everything and won’t  get to ask the questions that concern them most.

Once you’re on the trip, you can still arrange a professional Animal Communication session if you need one.

 

  • A check-in while you’re on a long trip may be a good idea.
  • If a crisis occurs delaying your return or affecting your animal’s well-being, a professional Animal Communicator can speak with you by phone and talk to you animal telepathically even while you’re still traveling.

Photo by Karina Vorozheeva on Unsplash

Cats rarely get to travel with their family. **

One of my clients had a situation arise just recently while she was traveling.

My client was on a business trip in the USA and her cat was home in The Netherlands.  The cat’s in his teens and has some health issues.

My client left him in excellent care, but a heat wave in The Netherlands affected his overall health situation.

What a relief my client and her cat both felt when I did a session for them allowing them to speak with each other through me.

It reassured and comforted both of them.

So keep in mind that when you travel, connection with your animals is as close as a phone call to an Animal Communicator professional.

* * * * *

* Photo by Daniel Cano on Unsplash

** Photo by Karina Vorozheeva on Unsplash

Telepathic Broadcast Part 2

May 30, 2018 by  
Filed under Animal Communication, In the Wild, New Posts

The Universe Answered.

Melissa, the Hunter

If you remember my post, “Telepathic Broadcast,” published on April 25, 2015, I asked the Universe to send me a feline hunter to live in my yard and keep the rodents under control.

Hattie had left her body, my yard was full of chipmunks, and there were mice in the house.

I thought for a long time that the universe hadn’t answered my request at all.

I was mistaken.

Melissa was born on April 24, 2015.  It has taken her a few years to mature into her role as hunter and guardian of our home.

It has also taken until just a few moment ago for me to recognize that Melissa meets all the requirements I set, even tho’ she lives inside with me and Starlight.

During last winter, she perfected her mousing skills indoors.

This spring, she perfected her chipmunk hunting skills outside.  She proudly brings one home nearly every day that she goes out.

I think of her like the Roman Goddess, Diana, and the Greek Goddess, Artemis.   According to Crystalinks.com

[Diana was] the goddess of the hunt and moon and birthing, being associated with wild animals and woodland, and having the power to talk to and control animals. She was equated with the Greek goddess Artemis, though she had an independent origin in Italy.

Melissa is a formidable hunter, focused, persistent, and able to move quicker than a blink.

While some of you may not be comfortable with cats that hunt, hunting is their natural way of being in the 3-D energies in which we’ve all been living.

Melissa is reluctant to move into higher vibrations, although she is clearing up many lifetimes of old stuff.  After all, she chose to be here with me, so she must, at some level, be on a spiritual path.

But for now, I have my magnificent feline hunter, and she is quite adept at her job!

I thank Melissa for being here for a multitude of reasons.

I thank the universe for answering my request, even if it took me 3 years to recognize that my request had been answered.

Tips for Litter Box Management

Meeting Simple Feline Standards

Would this box be large enough for a family of 2 or  3 cats?

Because cats really do care about the location, size, smell, and cleanliness of their litter boxes, it is important to provide a toilet facility that meets their standards.

Cats like to be clean. Since cats have to climb into a litter box and will get the odor of whatever is in the box onto their fur, they prefer to enter a box that is clean. If you have been getting away with a less than perfectly clean box and your cats are not protesting, then you have been very lucky.

Also, since cats lick themselves to bathe, and since they prefer to be clean, cats will be ingesting some of whatever you use for their litter. For health and other reasons, this should be an important consideration.

The most important thing to remember is that changes in an animal’s behavior are indications of a problem. Animals do not suddenly change their behavior for no reason. When it comes to litter boxes, the first thing a change in behavior might indicate is a health problem.

While each cat is a unique individual and has unique preferences and tolerances, here are some simple litter box tips that may be helpful to you and your cat(s).

 

The Family Litterbox.  Not everyone looks happy.

THE BOX

1. Make sure the box is large enough for the cat. A box that fits a kitten well might become too small for the same cat as an adult. Adult cats come in a variety of sizes, so keep that in mind as well.

2. “Location . . . location . . . location” – not just a slogan for real estate. Put litter boxes in places that are easy for each cat to get into and out of without being trapped or jumped on by other felines in the house. Also, choose a location that is just plain easy for a cat to use.

3. The recommended number of boxes to have is 1 for each cat + 1 more. This may not be necessary if you have only 1 or 2 cats, but as the number of felines goes up, this general rule becomes more important.

4. Plastic litter boxes eventually pick up the smell of urine. It is advisable to replace boxes every couple of years.

THE LITTER

1. Pick out the pee and poop a minimum of twice daily – more often if possible. Cats do not like to dig through urine and feces to “find a spot.”

2. Change the litter completely at least once a week, especially if you are not using a good quality clumping litter that is easy to pick out.

3. Choose a scent-free litter or one with a mild scent that is natural to the product of which the litter is made. Cats have a strong sense of smell and may not like having a chemical smell on their fur. This is also healthier for your cat, as the chemical gets on them and they ingest it when they groom.

4. Do not use chemicals or anything scented when you wash the box. Cat noses are much more sensitive than human noses, and if you use something that they don’t like to smell, they may stop using the box. Remember, also, that chemicals can be toxic, so use natural, safe products.

5. Some cats are very sensitive to the texture of the litter, especially if the cat has been declawed. A softer litter can increase a cat’s comfort even if it is not a clumping litter.

6. When changing to a new litter, it is best to mix the two litters together for a week or more. This gives your cats a chance to adjust to the new litter.

ELDER CATS

Some cats, as they age, develop arthritic problems in their backs and hind end. This may make it difficult for them to climb into a normal litter box. Here are some things you can do to help your senior citizen feline continue to use a litter box.

1. Try a cookie sheet as a litter tray so your elder cat can easily climb into it.

2. Some cats will adapt to “wee wee pads” while others still prefer to have litter in the cookie tray so they can cover their feces and urine.

3. A cardboard box can surround the tray with one end opened flat for easy access. This will minimize how much litter gets spread around due to the low sides of the cookie sheet. It will also keep the tray from moving around when the cat is using it, making it more comfortable for your cat to adapt.

* * * * *

For help with litter box problems, consider Animal Communication.  When we discover why your cat is not using the litter box, we have an opportunity to identify the underlying issue(s) and resolve them.  Contact Nedda at 860-651-5771 or neddaw@sbcglobal.net

Animal Communication Can Help Traumatized Animals

Any animal might experience trauma.

Any animal might experience trauma.

Photo by Mikhail Vasilyev

 

You can’t tell just by looking at a cat or dog, but PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) can affect animals as well as humans.

Loss of one’s human family and home due to floods, fires, earthquakes, and other natural situations are on the rise for animals.

Imagine if you experienced this loss, and then someone picked you up off the streets, put you in a cage, and sent you far away from your home so you’d never be able to find your human family again.

And many are moved around from shelter to shelter, while others are killed (euthanized is not a correct term here) out of so-called kindness.

This is the situation experienced by many displaced animals today. With the best of intentions, they are shipped by rescue organizations all over the US.

Their emotional state is often not taken into account, partially because many humans still don’t understand that animals feel just as humans do.

Visits to the veterinary office can also trigger stress.

Yesterday I took Starlight to the homeopathic veterinarian because she has an upper respiratory infection.  Her sense of smell is severely reduced and I have to put very smelly fish into her food to get her to eat.

Although the veterinarian we saw is quiet, calm, and gentle, and one whom Starlight has seen before, she became upset when I left for 2 minutes to use the restroom.  All the way home she meowed and said that she wasn’t sure it was me because she couldn’t smell me.

Cats rely on their sense of smell to identify people and other animals.   Of course, while driving a car, it’s hard to reassure a cat in a crate of anything.  Despite my reassurances verbally and telepathically,  she continued to be upset until we got home.

Once in her normal environment, she calmed down, used the litter box, and ate a hearty, fishy smelling meal.  Melissa grooming her helped, too.

If even this type of situation can cause stress, imagine what it’s like to go to the vet and be left there for surgery or after an injury without anyone explaining what’s happening.

Most veterinary practices perform euthanasia and the animals who are staying there are sick or injured, so the energy there can be intense.  Preparing a animal to see the vet can help, but may not be the whole answer, and isn’t always possible, especially in an emergency.

PTSD doesn’t always show up immediately after a traumatic event.  It may appear weeks or even months later.  And some animals may experience more than one trauma before showing symptoms.

There are lots of websites listing symptoms that could indicate PTSD in a dog or cat, but don’t necessarily mean the animal is experiencing PTSD.  For example, inappropriate urination can be caused by a urinary tract infection or other issues.

However if you notice any of these behaviors in your cats or dog, you might consider that there is something going on that is stress associated.  I found this wonderful list at:  http://www.goodpetparent.com/2015/02/06/ptsd-pets/

  • Uncharacteristic aggressiveness
  • Fearfulness, trembling
  • Increased agitation
  • Decreased appetite and weight loss
  • Reduced interest in playing, going for walks, or interacting with other pets and/or people
  • Hyper-vigilance (an intense, “on guard” awareness of surroundings)
  • Tendency to be easily startled
  • Urinating or defecating inside (when previously housebroken)
  • Increased neediness or attachment
  • Unprovoked whining or crying
  • Excessive barking or meowing
  • Destructive behavior
  • Extreme escape behavior to avoid a stresser (such as chewing through drywall to attempt to flee during a thunderstorm)
  • Sudden changes in temperament
  • Hiding for no reason
  • Excessive panting
  • Pacing
  • Fear of being alone
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Avoidance of people, places, or things associated with a traumatic event

Even an animal who has lived with you for some times can develop PTSD symptoms.  Still, when you are looking for a new companion, be aware that many may have gone through stressful situations before you find them.

When you open your heart to adopt someone at a rescue shelter, you may sense right away that the animal is in an enormous amount of emotional pain.  You may want to help, want to connect with them. You may feel drawn to adopt that person in fur or feathers.

But this isn’t always the case.  Some frightened beings are able to mask their emotions, and then when you get them home, it becomes obvious that there’s more going on than you might have suspected.

And once you realize that there’s something going on, the steps necessary for healing are not always obvious.

Since each case is different, general suggestions, such as “give the new animal his/her own space” or “be very patient with the animal” are great, but may not move the animal forward as effectively or as quickly as working with a professional animal communicator who can connect telepathically with your new companion.

A Professional Animal Communicators has special abilities that are very helpful to the animal:

  • the ability to sense and feel the animal’s energy.
  • the ability to to experience the animal’s perspective viserally and emotionally.
  • the ability catch glimpses of the animal’s inner emotional state, even when they may be deeply hidden.
  • The ability to help the animal communicate with their new human companions to facilitate mutual understanding.

Most animals respond well to someone making a telepathic connection, in part because it may be the first time they have ever experienced this and don’t have any old baggage around it.

Of course, that doesn’t mean the animal is going to open up and pour out their life history.

Just as you may find it too difficult to talk about your own life traumas, animals often feel the same way.  But just knowing that someone can listen and understand helps many animals begin to open up again.

When you’ve been traumatized, trust is at a minimum or gone, and rebuilding trust can take a very long time.

Still, in a telepathic conversation, it’s possible to encourage an animal to begin to consider the possibility that their life situation is improving and their feelings will be respected.

When you’re in a state of PTSD, the feeling of having no control and of being powerless makes recovery feel hopelessly impossible.

In contrast, an Animal Communicator can ask the animal what will make him/her more comfortable.  An Animal Communicator can encourage the animal to take some first steps towards healing.

Combining Animal Communication with Energy Healing and with The Emotion Code™ technique (of Dr. Bradley Nelson) brings together 3 powerful tools to help an animal transform back to feeling good about life.

So if you’ve recently brought home a new animal companion whom you suspect has some serious trauma in his/her past, consider Animal Communication and Energy Healing for your new family member.

Is Animal Communication a Spiritual Path?

Echo running free, mane flying.

Echo.  She’s forever with me.  How blessed I am!

The first time I heard someone say that animal communication was a spiritual path, I was startled by the idea.

For me, talking with animals was a natural and “normal” part of my life. I had been doing it since I was a child. How could this be a spiritual path when it was an every-day event for me?

I was already a professional Animal Communicator when I first encountered this idea, and over the years, it kept reverberating through my mind.

In retrospect, I can see now how very true it is that Animal Communication has been a spiritual path for me.

It was Echo, my Arabian horse, who opened me up spiritually in the 1980’s. She has been my companion, guide, teacher, and friend for many lifetimes. Whether in or out of a body, she is with me all the time.

Echo, just by being who she is, showed me more about myself, about animal communication, and about the vast possibilities of spirituality.

And today, Echo is still with me.  She is Starlight.  And she is still in her spirit form, all the at the same time.

Starlight in cat tree with toy.

Starlight is Echo discovering the joys of being a cat!

The animals are spirit in a body, just as we are.  When we open ourselves to receive their messages, we learn more about who they are, and even more about who we are.

This is why Animal Communication is a spiritual path.

It’s a way to discover the vastness of human potential.

It’s a way to merge our consciousness with that of another.

It’s a way to expand our awareness.

It’s a way to experience Unity Consciousness.

Have you ever merged into an animal body?

The meditation, “Becoming an Animal” is one I love to share with students in my classes.  You can do it over and over again because it’s never the same.   Each time you merge, you learning something new about an animal and, potentially, about yourself.

Merging with an animal confirms that we are not limited to our own body.  We are consciousness first and a physical body second.

Merging with an animals enhances your animal communication skills by taking them to another level.

Merging with an animal expands your spiritual consciousness.

Spanish Riding School - merging with a horse while riding.

Spanish Riding School – Merging with a horse while riding.

This was always my goal when I road Echo:  to be physically and spiritually merged at the same time.  She showed me how to do that, and it was AWESOME!!

So if you feel called to learn animal communication, perhaps one reason is that it may be a part of your spiritual path.

Let the animals guide and teach you.  They have much to offer.

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