Melissa Returns: Saving a Traumatized Kitten

 

Overcoming Trauma and Grief at 10 Weeks Old

by Nedda Wittels
Copyright © 2022

Crate with litter box, cave, and food.

Melissa’s safe space.

Melissa arrived at my house around 11 p.m. on Friday, December 10, 2021, after more than 12 hours of travel, most of which was on Amtrak.

She was in a state of physical, mental, and emotional exhaustion and trauma.

She was grieving intensely for her mother, father, siblings, and extended family, who all lived together in a feline community at Indian Spring Cattery in Virginia.

The trip on Amtrak had been noise, jostling, and terrifying to Melissa.

She hadn’t eaten or had anything to drink since that morning.  (Kittens typically don’t want to eat or drink when traveling, and to prevent travel sickness, they’re not usually offered food on a one-day trip.)

Melissa was also confused:  she wasn’t sure she had arrived where she was supposed to be!

It was dark in the car on the ride home from New Haven, so I couldn’t see how upset Melissa was.

I inadvertently added to her confusion by asking her what her name was. With her new body and beautiful clear energy, I had supposed that she might have chosen a new name.

I discovered days later that my questions about a name caused Melissa to decide that I didn’t recognize her and that she had had been given to the wrong person.

When she was finally able to talk to me about her name, it was clear that Melissa was the name she wanted, as it would prove to her that I knew who she was.

Cary Hanson, assistant to Dr. Doug Shar who owns Indian Spring Cattery, had brought Melissa to New Haven.  She was in Connecticut visiting family, and generously gave me her phone number in case there were problems.

I am very, very grateful to Cary for all her help that weekend.  We spoke several times, and her assistance was invaluable and critical to a successful turn around for Melissa.

First Things First:  Food, Water, and Electrolytes.

Melissa exploring inside the crate.

Melissa looking at a towel I used to keep the crate door from closing.

Every kitten at 10 weeks of age needs to eat at least 4 times a day and possibly more often that that.

Kittens grow very fast, but their tiny stomachs can’t hold enough food to keep up with their need for nutrition.

It’s best to have bowls of food available for free choice eating 24/7 so they can eat whenever they’re hungry.

Once at my house, I offered Melissa food and water, but she refused everything.

The canned food was exactly what the Indian Spring said they had been feeding the kittens, so it was familiar to her.

I also showed her the litter box, which had the same litter she was familiar with.  Fortunately, she immediately urinated in the litter box.

Then I noticed that Melissa was drooling.  This is a sign of severe distress.  It also meant fluid loss, which wasn’t a good thing since she wasn’t drinking.

Water and Electrolytes by Dropper

When she refused to eat or drink, I immediately started giving her both plain water and electrolytes by dropper.

Melissa clamped her mouth tightly shut and struggled to get out of my strong but gentle hold on her.

I had to force tiny drops of liquid into the side of her mouth – just 2 or 3 drops at a time so she wouldn’t choke on them.

The wet food was pate, and I added a bit of water and electrolytes and tried to get that into her as well, but had little success.  She kept spitting out whatever I managed to get into her mouth.

By Saturday afternoon I was very worried.

Important Products to Help Melissa Relax

I did the best I could to create a peaceful, loving space for her.

Rescue Remedy – I put some directly onto Melissa and misted it around the room.  This seemed to have little to no effect.

Grief Relief (FES brand) flower essence formula – I put some on her paws, face, and body, but it didn’t seem to help, either.

Homeopathic Ignatia 30 C – I gave her a dose of this remedy well known for assisting with trauma and grieving.  This, too, had no observable effect.

Feliway, the feline pheromone spray – On Saturday, I ran out and bought a spray bottle of it since the plugins I had ordered hadn’t arrived.  It’s  supposed to help cats and kittens calm down.  I sprayed some onto a soft, cuddly toy I had bought and put it into the cat cave, encouraging Melissa cuddle up with it.  She refused to have anything to do with it.

Peaceful Music – I began to chant a very peaceful Sanskrit chant that ‘s used in the ashram I go to at mealtimes.  It did seem to quiet her a bit, but she still drooled and refused food.

Gentle, Loving Handling

I cut up a very old, super-soft wash cloth into 4 pieces, using them to gently wash and dry her off.  She enjoyed being rubbed, but continued to drool.

In fact, if anything in the room moved, including me, her drooling would intensify, or if previously stopped for a moment, immediately start up again.

I had a soft brush I had bought that felt like a cat tongue, but Melissa didn’t seem to like it much.  I decided it was probably too harsh for her tender little body.

Melissa didn’t want me to pick her up, didn’t make eye contact, didn’t try to connect with me.  She just lay limply in my arms, and when she did move, would bite or scratch me and try to get away.

Did I think I had a kitten-proof room?

I was keeping Melissa in the crate at night, hoping that would help her feel safe.

During the day, I encouraged her to move around the room – to stretch, to use a scratching post, and to explore her space.  I even hoped she might become interested in a toy or two.

Despite all my careful plans for kitten-proofing the room, Melissa would look for and find places to hide.

I had to keep moving things around to make sure I could find her to try to get food and water into her, and that upset her, too.

Overwhelming Grief and Depression

Whenever I lifted Melissa out of her bed to hold her, feed her, and clean off the drool, I would talk to her.

I told her how happy I was that she had come back.

I told her how much I loved her, and that Starlight and I were very happy to see her in her new, beautiful body.

I told her that I knew I couldn’t replace her real mother – that I wouldn’t even try.  I knew her mother was very special, and that I loved her parents for giving her this new life.

I told her that I would take very good care of her and help her settle in to her new home.

I told her how important is was that she eat and drink on her own.

Melissa wasn’t saying much back to me except an occasional “I want to go home” in the saddest, most grief-stricken little telepathic voice imaginable.

Home was where her parents were, not here.

Melissa’s longing for home – her mother especially – was so intense, so plaintive that I felt like crying myself.

No matter what I did, she refused to be comforted.

I could feel Melissa’s intense grief and sadness.  Because I’m a strong empath, I could also feel Golda, her mother, was very worried about her.  Golda’s energy was all around Melissa trying desperately to comfort and support her.  I telepathically reassured Golda that I was doing all I could for her daughter.

While between incarnations, Melissa had told me she had found the perfect mother – someone who was very warm, loving, and nurturing.  Golda certainly fit the bill.

Melissa longed for the touch of her mother’s tongue, the smell of her mother’s body, and the warmth a kitten feels when piled up with siblings and family.

I felt like I had stolen someone’s child!  How is it we think it’s fine to take 8 or 9 or even 10 or 12-week old babies from healthy mothers just because they’re kittens or puppies and are eating from a bowl instead of a nipple?

How can we justify this?

I had never thought about the emotional impact of it, nor about the loss the parents of these babies must feel.

To see a photo and read a description of Golda, tap or click on this link
Indian Spring Cats: Meet the Parents
and scroll down the page a bit.
To see and read about Choco, Melissa’s father, scroll a bit further.

Starlight’s Experience Had Been Very Different

Starlight shortly after she arrived.

When Starlight came to me in 2012 at 9 weeks of age, she was ready to come – excited to come.

While she missed the large family she had had at Reprise Siamese Cattery, she was thrilled to be back with me.

Starlight was filled with joy and love when she arrived.  She recognized me immediately, ate well, and was playful.  She had never been a cat before, so she was figuring it all out.

Starlight is a very sensitive being, and she got all the attention a baby needed.

I thought I was prepared to take care of Melissa, but I quickly realized that Melissa needed me to be even more attentive and nurturing.

The Danger of Dehydration Had to Be Overcome.

Both dehydration and lack of food cause mental confusion and can lead to death. Dehydration also causes an animal to reject food.

While Melissa didn’t immediately need veterinary care, I was determined to do as much as I could to avoid taking Melissa to an emergency clinic for subcutaneous fluids.  That experience, while helpful physically, would add to her trauma.

Could I get her through this and avoid another car trip, avoid going into a strange place with people she didn’t know and smells and sounds that might frighten her even more?

Every hour or two, day and night, I did my best to get liquid and food into Melissa

I’m very familiar with the symptoms of dehydration in cats because my cat, Violet, had been in renal failure for the last 2 years of her life.  Violet had lived to be nearly 18 without needing subcutaneous fluids, taking several droppers full of electrolytes each day.

To succeed with Melissa, I had to get past her clamped jaw so she would swallow some liquid.

Would it be enough?

When cats become dehydrated, they exhibit some very clear symptoms.  The one I kept closest watch on was the Pinch Test.

  • Normally, when you pinch the skin at the back of a cat’s neck, it should immediately rebound.
  • If it moves slowly back, there is some dehydration.
  • If it doesn’t return to normal, dehydration is severe and this is a RED ALERT situation!  Subcutaneous fluids are needed immediately to avoid death.

The Danger of Not Eating Had to Be Defeated.

Adult cats cannot go without food for more than 3 days without their livers starting to collapse.  I don’t know what the timing is for kittens, but I was very aware of this deadline.  Melissa had eaten before leaving the cattery on Friday morning, and somehow I had to get her to eat on her own.

The cattery had provided specific information about what they had fed the kittens, and I had purchased the canned food, but not the dry food.

When I first spoke with Cary on Saturday, she told me Melissa really liked the dry food, so out I ran to Stop and Shop where they sold it.  Melissa only ate a few pieces.

On Sunday, I was still desperate to get Melissa to eat.  Cary suggested Greek Yogurt.  Back to Stop & Shop I went.  Melissa ate only 2 or 3 licks.

I was still giving electrolytes and water by dropper every hour or two, and I was still putting bits of canned food into her mouth which she was spitting out.

Two things happened on Monday morning that saved Melissa from a trip to a vet clinic.

1- I called the office of Dr. Charles Loops, an experienced homeopathic veterinarian in North Carolina where I was already a client.  I requested and received emergency assistance.

Dr. Loops said to use Ignatia at 1M potency – that the 30C was far too weak.

This had an immediate dramatic effect on Melissa.  It began shifting her out of her state of grief and trauma, and made her more interested in eating and drinking.

Regarding homeopathy:  It’s been my experience that when you give the correct homeopathic remedy, an animal or human will often sleep for a bit as the remedy begins to work.  Melissa went into a relaxed sleep with the very first dose.  When she woke up, she was better than I had seen her since she had arrived and showed actual interest in food and water.

Ignatia 1M became the remedy I used with Melissa over the coming weeks with enormous success.  She continued to improve with each dose.

2- Cary Hansen suggested I offer Melissa raw chicken breast.  I feed raw chicken to my cats anyway, so I plenty on hand.  I just warmed up and pureed some.

Melissa immediately ate some chicken with relish.  This was a big turning point.  I could now add electrolytes directly into the food until she no longer needed them.  Melissa was on the road to recovery at last!

The Miracle That Is Starlight

Starlight grooming.

My feline heroine!

Throughout the weekend and into the following weeks, Starlight was amazing.

I was able to count on her to be supportive and totally cooperative and helpful.

She never minded how much time I was spending with the kitten and how much less time she was having with me.

She never minded that I smelled from another cat, a stranger, who smelled very different from the Melissa she and I had previously known.

She never sat outside the door of Melissa’s room yowling or hissing or carrying on in any way, something some other cats would have done.

She never even tried to get into the room when I delivered bowls of water or anything else to Melissa.  She would be there with me out of feline curiosity, but respected that it wasn’t time for her to meet Melissa.

Starlight has always been a great blessing, a great friend, a terrific companion to me in many lifetimes.  No matter what physical form Starlight has chosen when she’s with me, I have always been able to count on her.  I am enormously grateful.

SUCCESS at last!

By the end of the first week, Melissa was eating and drinking on her own, playing a bit, and exploring her private space.

Melissa playing with a rag toy.

Infinite gratitude and appreciation to:

Karen Nowak and Leslie Russell,
dear friends who supported me through this critical time.

Dr. Doug Shar from Indian Spring Cats,
who provided such an excellent place where Melissa could return.

 Cary Hansen, Dr. Shar’s assistant,
who brought Melissa to me, and whose advice helped me get Melissa to eat and drink.

Golda and Choco, Melissa’s beautiful and loving parents.

Dr. Charles Loops and staff, who responded quickly to my call for help.

My beloved Starlight, who was a complete angel throughout.

Melissa, who bravely reincarnated to be with Starlight and me once again.

There’s more to the saga of Melissa.
Look for the next installment coming soon.

Melissa Returns: A Difficult Beginning

 

A New Body.  A New Life Plan.

by Nedda Wittels
Copyright © 2022

Melissa photo from cattery.

Melissa 9 weeks old. Photo by Indian Spring Cattery, VA.

I expected to wait for months and months for Melissa to reincarnate.  In fact, I had asked Melissa to wait until February, 2022.  Being Melissa, she hadn’t said she would do that, but she also didn’t say “no” to my request.  Still, when the email with the photo arrived in early December, I was surprised.

Starlight and I had gotten into a very comfortable rhythm in our life together since Melissa had been euthanized in August, 2021.  Although I wanted Melissa to come back, I was willing to give Starlight as much time as she needed to explore being an only cat.

Then on Tuesday, December 7, 2021, I received an email from Indian Spring Cattery in Virginia.  I had contacted the breeder, Dr. Doug Schar, in early October, explaining that I expected my friend in spirit, Melissa, to return, and that she had told me she had found a breeding female at his cattery that she wanted for a mother.

I also explained I was a professional Animal Communicator, and that I’d recognize her from a photo.  It would be a female kitten, a Tonkinese.

To my amazement, Dr. Schar was completely open to helping me find the returning Melissa, even with his rule about kittens going to people in the order in which they send in a deposit.  He had experienced a feline friend return to him, which made it easier for him to understand my situation.

The circumstances surrounding this kitten were interesting.   She was supposed to go to a family that had suddenly decided to move and couldn’t take her.  Clearly, the Soul or Spirit of Melissa must have had advanced information, otherwise, why take this body if it meant ending up somewhere else?

Human reactions can be complex and complicated.  I took one look at the photo, and burst into tears and sobs.  Clearly my heart had instantly recognized her.  Meanwhile, my mind was telling me this couldn’t possibly be Melissa.  So for the first 24 hours, my mind and my heart were in this strange dance.

Once I accepted my heart’s knowledge as “truth,” I had more challenges to address.  I, myself, couldn’t go to Virginia to pick up the kitten.  Fortunately, there was an unexpected, miraculous solution.

Cary Hanson, Dr. Shar’s assistant, was coming to Connecticut by Amtrak on Friday, December 10, to visit family.  If this was Melissa, all I had to do was to meet them at New Haven’s Amtrak station that Friday evening, and the kitten would be delivered into my arms.

I spent the rest of the week organizing for Melissa’s arrival.  I can’t remember now everything I did, but here are just a few of the things I do recall.

  • Set up the St. Bernard-size dog crate to contain the kitten.
  • Kitten-proof the room — not a small task.
  • Buy everything she needed, especially the food she had been weaned onto, the litter she’d was accustomed to, toys for a baby kitten, and more.
  • I had to make sure that Starlight was going to be OK with the sudden return of Melissa.
  • Find someone to drive me to New Haven on a Friday evening.  I can’t drive safely at night, nor on interstate highways.

I said many prayers that all would come together in Divine Right timing.

I’m very lucky, graced, in fact, to have some amazing friends who were eager to help and who considered a trip to New Haven to get a kitten a fun adventure.

With great excitement we arrived in New Haven with time to spare, and then had to wait several hours due to train delays.  When Cary finally arrived, she climbed into my friends’ car and we moved a kitten from one carrier to another and took care of all the paper work.

It was a 2 hours drive back to my house.  Melissa had been on the road since about 10 a.m. that morning and we got home close to midnight.  She hadn’t eaten or used the litter box since leaving the cattery.

When I took her out of the carrier, I noticed that she was wet.  She was drooling.  She was limp and not very responsive.  Clearly, she was traumatized.

I put her into the litter box, but she just seemed dazed.  Fortunately, she did urinate.

I offered her water and food, but she wouldn’t eat or drink. This was not a good sign.

Holding her and stroking her and speaking softly to her didn’t elicit any reaction.

I placed her into the warm and soft cat cave I had ready for her, and she just lay there, completely limp.

Because I’m a strong emotional empath, I could feel her overwhelming grief, loss, confusion, and terror.

I already had sprayed the room with Rescue Remedy, and I put some on Melissa.  I had ordered Feliway, but it hadn’t yet arrived.

I managed to get a few drops of water into her mouth, despite her jaws being clamped shut.

For the next 3 days, I struggled to get food, water, and electrolytes into a kitten who was completely overwhelmed and who seemed not to recognize me.

Crate with litter box, cave, and food.

Melissa’s safe space.

Infinite gratitude and appreciation to:

Bob and Nishanto Kane,
dear friends drove me to New Haven to get Melissa.

There’s more to the saga of Melissa.
Look for the next installment coming soon.

 

Starlight on Her Own.

 

Transitioning From Many Cats to Just One.
Copyright © Nedda Wittels, 2022
As written by Starlight and Nedda.

Starlight, Siamese, groowming.

Nedda:

I started writing this post, and then had the thought, “Starlight should be the one to write this.”  And then realized that Starlight was, in fact, asking to write it.  After all, it is her story, her experience.  So my job here is to translate into the written word what Starlight wants to share.

Starlight:

Missing Melissa

When Melissa died [“Melissa: A Challenging Life”], I was very sad and lonely.  Of course, I had Nedda for company, but Melissa and I had a very special, loving, feline relationship, and for the first time, there were no other cats in my life.

There was no one to groom me or for me to groom, although I sometimes groomed Nedda’s head while she lay in bed, and she daily groomed me with a very luscious brush.

Starlight and Melissa cuddling.

Me and Melissa cuddling.

Nedda and I grieved together, which means we supported each other, cuddled each other, and reassured each other.  I spent more time in Nedda’s lap each day than I ever had before.  Was that for her?  For me?  For both of us!  It felt great to just jump up and not have someone else objecting or trying to get into her lap at the same time.

Purring helped us both, too.  Purring is a healing sound, and Nedda even began trying to purr.  I know she really can’t, but I appreciated her efforts, and the sound she was able to make was very comforting to both of us.

I love to sit on Nedda’s meditation seat because the energy is so lovely.

At first, what I found most strange about being the only cat was that I could go anywhere in the house, sit anywhere, lie down anywhere, and no one would challenge me to move or to give up my spot.  I felt my body start to unwind some of the tension that it held from being growled at or hit on the head because Someone Else wanted me to acknowledge her dominance.

Another big change was that I could jump in Nedda’s lap many times a day and I didn’t have to wait my turn or share it with anyone else.  It felt just right – perfect for me to be there.

At night, for the first time ever, I could crawl under the covers with Nedda whenever I chose.  This was very new.  The dominant cats had always taken that position on the bed.  I wasn’t  certain how to lie down under the covers. 

Should my feet be against Nedda’s body, or my back? 

Would Nedda role over on me while she slept? 

Did I need to have my claws ready to remind her I was there?

I had never been able to work this out before because first Violet, and later Melissa, always insisted on being in the spot I might have wanted.  Now it was just me, and I had to figure it all out.

Soon I found the best position for me, and totally relaxed into it.  Nedda relaxed more, too, and these were some of the best cuddles of my life.

Similarly, eating was different.  No one tried to eat out of my bowl, and Nedda and I would dine together, just the two of us. 

Nedda was concerned that I might be lonely, and asked several times about getting another cat, but she and I both understood that I was exploring and needed time to do that. 

Who am I really?  What do I like as a cat?

Can I allow my energy to fill the entire house and feel comfortable with that?

Suddenly, I realized that I could be myself.  I could use my voice more and no one would tell me to “shut up.”  In fact, Nedda kept saying, “I love to hear your voice.  Keep on singing.” and I began singing more.  I discovered I could make a wider range of sounds than I had since my first weeks as a kitten.  Nedda listened and encouraged me to sing more and more and more.  It was fun!

Melissa and I used to go outside together and with Nedda.  Melissa ran and ran.  I sometimes ran, but I really like to sit and watch – birds, squirrels, chipmunks, moles, butterflies, bees – and even Melissa. 

Now, there was only Nedda and me.  We took some walks around the yard, but it wasn’t the same.

Climbing Trees?  Who, me?

Melissa used to do the strangest things.  She’d climb trees – really big trees – way high up.  [About 10-12 feet.]  I couldn’t believe my eyes the first time she did that.  I kept wondering, “How will she get down?”  But Melissa somehow knew how to wrap herself around the trunk of the tree and to use her hind feet with her front feet to return safely to the ground.

Melissa also wasn’t afraid to jump down from a very high place.  Jumping down had always stumped me.  Nedda says it’s a horse thing, and she’s probably right that I still have horsey characteristics.

So I began trying to get up my courage to climb a little ways up tree trunks.  I’d make a big run towards a tree to get lots of energy, and go as high as I dared, which wasn’t any higher than I felt safe to jump down.  [About 4 feet most of the time; 6 feet once. ]  Nedda always kindly cheered me on for my efforts.  But I knew that I’d never climb as high as Melissa, and that Nedda loves me just as I am.

So after Melissa died, I did try climbing a bit, but the inspiration was gone and while Nedda and I had fun picking up branches and playing outside, I preferred to sit quietly and watch other animals.  The squirrels were particularly insulting about me having given up, but squirrels can be very rude and I just ignored them.

I began to feel and more myself – my very own self – not having to compromise who I am for anyone else.  It was a very good feeling.  I felt myself growing and growing inside, expanding and letting go of restrictions I had accepted to make sure other cats would love and accept me.

I’m not a hunter, and never will be.

Then there was the issue of “mousing,” as Nedda calls it.

Two cats looking under a table at a mouse.

Melissa and me hunting a mouse in the house in the wee hours of the morning.

When I chose to be a cat in this life, I knew that it might be expected of me to hunt and kill rodents, birds, and insects.  After all, that’s part of being a cat, right?  But killing has always felt wrong to me in many lifetimes.  I knew a cat has to eat meat, but I also knew I couldn’t, wouldn’t kill.

Melissa and I would hunt as a team to chase down any rodent who came (or whom Melissa brought) into the house.  I had to admit it was fun to work together to catch the rodent, and to play with it with my paws.

Melissa took this very seriously, and taught me how to pay attention to where the rodent had hidden and to what she was doing all at the same time.  She’d tell me where to look, where to go to block an exit, and how to synchronize my movements with hers.  She was a patient teacher, and never admonished me when I made a mistake.

Red squirrels are very fierce and very fast, but Melissa managed to kill one. Nedda was impressed.

Melissa and I would play with the animal, taking turns, and then finally, Melissa would either kill the rodent or, on rare occasions, let it go.  When she killed it, she’d nearly always eat some or all of the body.  She especially liked to eat their heads.  Once or twice, she let me eat a baby mole she had killed.  It tasted a bit weird, but still good.  I’ve always liked to try out new foods.

I once caught a large insect Nedda calls a dragon fly.  It was in the autumn, and the insect was dying.  I brought it to Nedda, who took it from me and set it somewhere to have a peaceful death.  I was happy to have brought her a gift because Melissa had brought her so many gifts of animals she had caught.

Now that Melissa was gone, Nedda asked me to hunt on my own.  This seemed like a ridiculous request on her part.  Me?  Hunt?  Alone?  Really?  What are you thinking?

I was sitting in my favorite spot just outside the garage watching squirrels one day when Nedda called me from the porch.  “Starlight.  There’s a chipmunk on the porch.” she called.

I ran onto the enclosed porch and Nedda pointed towards a pile of boxes.  “I saw a chipmunk run back there.” Nedda told me.

I could smell it, so I began a search for it.  But at the same time, I said to Nedda, “I’m not going to kill it.”

“Fine,” Nedda replied.  “Just chase it out.  Scare it off.  You don’t need to kill, but I’d appreciate if you’d keep the rodents away from the house.” 

Nedda turned to go back inside.

“Where are you going?” I asked her. suddenly feeling overwhelmed by the prospect of hunting alone.  “I’m used to working as a team.  You have to help.” I pleaded with her.

“Starlight,” she answered, “I can’t smell it, and I’m too big to fit into the places the chipmunk can go.”

I stopped what I was doing and turned towards her.  “You really can’t smell it?  What’s wrong with your nose?  Is your nose working correctly?”

Nedda sighed.  “Human noses are not as sensitive as cat noses.  I just can’t smell it enough to find out where it is.”

“How sad,” I told her.  And I meant it.  What a poor nose to miss all these powerful smells.

By this time, the chipmunk had made it’s escape. 

I took Nedda’s request seriously and began spending some time in the evening and at night in the places where mice liked to come into the house.  I would tell them:  “This is a mouse-free zone.  Mice are not welcome here.  I will wack you very hard if I get the chance.” 

I think they heard me, because I didn’t see very many of them as the weather turned colder and winter approached.

What if Melissa wants to return?

The day after Melissa’s death, she came to visit us in her spirit form.  She was so very different, so peaceful and so clear.  She and I talked, and she and Nedda talked. 

Melissa told me she was very happy and free, and wanted to return as a cat at some point.  Was I OK with that?  Of course I said, “Yes, I would love you to come back.”

Two cats: Starlight grooming Melissa

I missed the special times.

Nedda told me she had a similar conversation with Melissa, and that she had also said, “Yes” to Melissa’s request to return.  Nedda wanted to know if I was OK with that, and I certainly was.

We had no idea when this would happen, and Nedda and I weren’t in a rush.  We left it up to Melissa.

As I began to get more in touch with who I am and how I want to be in this life, it became clear to me that being alone was a good thing for me.  I realized I wasn’t in any hurry for there to be another cat in the house.  Melissa was still welcome, but if she took 6 months or a year, that would be OK with me.

Nedda, on the other hand, was grieving so deeply.  She kept looking at photos online of rescued cats.  I could feel she was hoping to see Melissa there, but mostly she just saw photos of very sad, very unhappy abandoned cats who needed to have love poured into them.  One or two even looked a bit like Melissa.  I think it just made her sadder when she did this.

As I began to change, Nedda realized how much she and I needed time alone together.  We were really enjoying each other and it was a very special and precious time that we hadn’t had before.  Everything was put on hold . . . well, sort of everything. 

Nedda began looking at websites of Thai Tonkinese breeders, Melissa’s favorite breed.  It was like she was wishing Melissa back into a body.  I know that can’t happen because I’ve been between incarnations, and it’s not up to those already incarnated to decide on anything about someone else’s return.

Melissa would visit us in her spirit form and she and Nedda would talk about various catteries and what the cats looked like and whether the energy there felt right for Melissa, and other considerations.  I mainly stayed out of it.

But I could see/feel Nedda’s longing.  It didn’t make me feel less loved, but I knew that Nedda really needed Melissa to return.  So when it happened, I wasn’t very surprised.  But it did feel too soon for me.  That’s the honest truth.

Nedda:

In transcribing this for Starlight, I’ve made extra effort not to modify or change the essence, feeling, meaning, or thoughts that she wants to share, regardless of how it might make me appear.  This is truly Starlight’s story, and I hope you can feel/sense her beauty and love as it pours through my fingers into this post.

There’s more to the saga of Melissa.

Look for the next installment coming soon.

Orphaned Newborn Alpaca Thrives When Telepathic Communication with Him, His Deceased Mother, and the Herd Creates Optimal Solutions for Survival.

© Nedda Wittels, January 8, 2020.

Newborn Milano, baby alpaca (cria) about one day old.

As soon as I picked up the phone and heard Keiko’s voice, I knew something urgent was going on.

Star nursing her newborn son, Milano

Star nursing her newborn son, Milano

Star, mother of a newborn Alpaca, called a cria, had died within 24 hours of his birth.

Fortunately, she had been able to nurse the baby, so he did get collostrum, the milk that contains all the antibodies a new born animal needs until the immune system develops.

But now Keiko had to figure out how to keep this spunky little boy alive.

There was no other lactating female alpaca on the farm to become a mother substitute for Milano.

He would have to nurse from a bottle every 2 hours for many weeks and it would take at least 6-8 months before he no longer needed milk.

Another complication was that male baby alpacas that bond with human mother substitutes can be very aggressive to humans as they mature.  Young male alpacas naturally practice mounting their mothers, and for a teenage or adult alpaca to do that to a human would be highly dangerous to the human.

The Animal Communication session was complex.  We needed to

  • Reassure Milano that he would be loved and cared for despite his loss of Star, his mother.
  • Find a female adult alpaca in the herd willing to be a mother substitute without nursing Milano.  Dezi volunteered.
  • Calm the herd due to the sudden, unexpected death of Star, who had been part of the herd for years, and help with their grieving.
  • Ask Milano’s father, who lives on the farm with other male lamas, to assist in raising Miliano.
  • Speak to Star, now in spirit, about her unexpected passing.
  • Brainstorm with Keiko and the herd to figure out how to get Milano to nurse from bottles, but associate them with alpacas, and not bond inappropriately with humans.

When animals live in a herd situation, there is a definite herd consciousness in addition to the individual consciousness of each herd member.  Basically, everyone is telepathically connected all the time, although individuals can sometimes protect themselves from something going on that makes that individual uncomfortable.

In this session, I had to be able to speak to many individuals as individual; to the herd in general, and to the spirit of Star.

During the session we helped everyone cope with their feelings and asked various members of the herd to help out in various ways.  Then the herd was invited to brainstormed with Keiko and me on how to best care for Milano.

I asked Keiko to keep me up to date on how things developed, as any glitch in the plan could quickly cause a young cria to experience a serious setback.

In the latest update from Keiko, January 8, 2020, she wrote,

Milano and herd at 3 weeks old.

Milano at 3 weeks old with his herd of female alpaca.

Milano is now 3 weeks and 2 days old! He has doubled his birth weight and is really doing well.  He’ll need to be bottle fed during the night for more weeks, but I am very relieved.  He seems to be thriving.

During the day he is with the entire herd. At night, we put him in a smaller pen with Dezi and a few volunteers lately.   His full sister who will stay here [on our farm], Sophie, has been watching him more lately, and she looks the closest to Star (mom we lost) so every once in a while, I gasp.

Today I received this testimonial from Keiko.

Thank you so much, Nedda, for helping me navigate an emotionally intense, complex situation when we lost a mama alpaca and suddenly had a 36 hour old orphaned cria for the first time on our farm.

I couldn’t think clearly as the loss was unexpected and sudden- but I knew the focus had to be on the cria and I had no time to lose if I wanted the cria to survive. But I sure felt too emotional to do this on my own.

I was SOOOO happy and relieved when you were able to squeeze in a session for me right away. I can’t tell you how much that meant to me.  You helped me think things through and figure out how to involve the herd for best results.

Now, 3.5 weeks later- baby is thriving! We have a nice little routine going and although not the most ideal situation since we don’t have his mama..I feel because of your help and the action plan we were able to set up as soon as we did, we have been able to move forward as a family and herd and find all the blessings.

The herd has followed through with the commitments they made, although they need reminders every once in a while.  Dezi, who accepted the adult guardian alpaca role, really has stepped up in her role [as Milano’s substitute mother].

We’re still in it for the long haul since it takes 6 months for alpaca babies to wean…but I am thrilled with the results you have been able to help me get through just one session!!! Thank you and much love!!!”

Keiko Makarczyk, Taylor,  TX.
Wisteria Suri Ranch
https://wisteriasuriranch.com/

I’m so grateful that I could be of service to Keiko, Milano, and the herd.  Animal Communication proves again and again that telepathy with animals is a powerful way for humans and animals to share love and problem solve.

Ten Reasons I Love Communicating Telepathically with Animals

 

Can you find Starlight?

Of all the professions I have had over my lifetime, Animal Communicator is the one I love the best and have had the longest – 25 years this year.

Communicating telepathically with animals brings so many rewards for me personally, for the animals, and for my human clients, too.

Here are some of my favorite things about communicating telepathically with animals.

1_ Communicating with animals reminds me to have my heart open.

Having an open heart facilitates the telepathic exchange.  Also, the more open-hearted you are, the more you live from your personal truth and Divine Self.

Many Animals, as most humans, aren’t always open-hearted due to the stresses they may have encountered in their lives.

When I talk telepathically with animals, I can help them restore their hearts to greater peace, love, and openness.

2_ Animals are amazing teachers.

Even when you don’t think your animals are teaching you, just by being with you, they are showing you other ways to be.

Some are demonstrating how to meditate or how to be peaceful or how to trust.

Many dogs are excellent at show us how to enter spaces joyfully and with enthusiasm.

Many cats are superb meditators.

Birds may teach us the joy of flying free – letting go of our limitations so we can truly soar.

Some horses tell me when they run free, they get that same experience of flying.

3_ Animals generally love us unconditionally, and when I communicate with them, I can feel their love for their families.

Whether I’m speaking with an animal in spirit, an animal preparing to leave her body, or a youngster creating havoc in someone’s home, their love is very powerful.

Over the years, I’ve had my face telepathically washed with big wet doggie tongue-greetings, telepathically tickled with feline whisker-kisses, and telepathically head-butted by enthusiastic horses.  Birds often telepathically perch on my head or an arm or finger.

No matter what type of animal I’m speaking with, the love can be very strong and will be beautifully expressed by each animal in his own unique way.

4_ Animals help us expand our perspectives by offering their own, which may be quite insightful and illuminating.

I’ll always remember the cat who told his human that her husband’s heart problem wasn’t just physical, but came from not letting in love.

The cat gave explicit instructions on buying a card with an angel on it and the cat offered a well-phrased loving message for the wife and son to write in the card.   The message was so beautiful, it brought tears to my eyes and those of the woman.

5_ Animals are very forgiving.

I’ve had many clients who call me riddled with guilt about what they did and/or didn’t do for their animal before the animal left their body.

When I ask the animal about it, they consistently are understanding, kind, gentle, forgiving, caring and even nurturing for their person.  What a blessing that they sometimes love us more than we love ourselves.

6_ Animals are great at reflecting our issues back to us so we can grow and change.

Melissa in November 2015

Melissa.

One day I was furious with Melissa.  While driving the car, I was ranting to myself about all the things she did that I found infuriating.

Then I had the sudden and startling realization that all of Melissa’s issues were an exact match for my own – some from when I was a child or teenager – some that still needed to be resolved.

This insight helped me move out of judgment and into unconditional love for both Melissa and myself.  What a great learning experience.

7_ Animals are fabulous healers, and offer their healing without reservation.

In 2003 I had just come home after surgery to repair a broken ankle.  I was on my back, asleep, with my leg in a cast and raised up on two pillows.

I awoke to the phone ringing, and when I tried to sit up, I found I couldn’t move.

My two cats at the time, Violet and Sakhara, together weighing over 20 pounds, were both lying on my cast.  They were offering their healing energies and purrs, which actually vibrate at rates that heal bone.

8_ Animals often come to us again, and again, across multiple lifetime.

Starlight

Starlight, my lovely Siamese, was my Arabian mare, Echo, in her last lifetime.  Now she’s a cat.  This has made for some fascinating, mind-expanding experiences.

They have so much in common, I created a new word, “feliquine” [feline+equine] – a horse who comes back as a cat!

Read more about their similarities:  Starlight and Echo – A Reincarnation Comparison

9_ Animals can have a great sense of humor.

While most of my clients rarely ask their animals to tell funny stories, I did have one client who was curious about what her dog would say.

The dog told about one Thanksgiving when the cat had jumped on the table, attacking the turkey, which went flying onto the floor so the dogs and cats could all feast.

The woman and her daughter laughed and laughed as they recalled this hilarious experience.

Violet

My cat Violet, now in spirit, used to give me a Jack Benny stare while making a smart-ass quip about something.

She always looked insulted while I roared with laughter at her remarks.

Without telepathy, I never would have known enjoyed her wry sense of humor, which had nothing at all to do with physical behaviors.

10_ Animals are an expression of the Divine, just as humans are.

We’re all ultimately One Consciousness, and animals often are showing us the way to that incredible, blessed Unity of Being that is our ultimate goal as we return to the higher dimensions of Unconditional, Divine Love and pure Divine Light.

I talk telepathically with my animals all the time.  It enriches every single day of my life.

Communicating telepathically with animals has been and continues to be a great blessing, and I’m privileged to be able to help others communicate with their animals, too.

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