Why Save a Wasp’s Life.

Are some lives more important than others?

Are all lives of equal value?

There was a very large wasp inside the porch one day last summer. 

The wasp was at a sliding screen door that I never open, although the inner glass door was open that day.

It appeared very upset.  It felt trapped.

I tried to speak with it, but it was already too upset to listen.  I sensed a great deal of anger and frustration coming from the wasp, so I left it alone for a while.

I locked the cats inside the house so the wasp couldn’t come further into our living space.  Then I opened the sliding screen door about 2 inches so the wasp could get out.  All it needed to do was go to the end of the door, and it would be free.

As I watched the wasp pacing back and forth from one side of screen to the other, I realized it was never going to discover the opening. 

The screen door’s metal frame was, in width, twice the length of the wasp’s body.   The wasp needed to take just 2 more steps when it reached the frame, and it would be free.   But each time it came to the metal frame it turned away .

So I tried explaining this to the wasp.   I sent it telepathic images about which way to go and how far to go.

I felt the wasp’s incredulity that I wanted to help it and not to kill it.  It didn’t trust me.  It couldn’t find the opening and soon decided I must be lying.

I needed a new approach.

I picked up an old newspaper, folding it to an easy length for me to handle.  When the wasp got close to the door frame at the open edge, I placed the edge of the newspaper against the screen, preventing the wasp from retreating more than a few steps.

The wasp saw the barrier and turned to go back towards the open end.  I kept encouraging it verbally and telepathically not to give up. 

I carefully and slowly moved the paper closer to the wasp, narrowing the space the wasp had available to move in the “wrong” direction, i.e., away from the opening.

As the wasp moved back and forth, I kept narrowing the space in which the wasp could retreat.   Soon it  found the opening and flew away.

I received a telepathic  “thank you” filled with surprise from the departing wasp.

The Wasp’s Lesson

 

The wasp’s behavior raised some important questions for me about myself. 

  • Do I sometimes fail to see opportunities because I’m stuck in rigid thoughts, beliefs, and behaviors?
  • Do I hold myself back because I’m unwilling to take a risk or a leap of faith?
  • Are these some of the ways I trap myself in limitation?

Every living being has something to teach us about ourselves.  This is one reason why honoring all life is so vital to our own well-being.

If I had killed the wasp, would I have thought to ask these questions and move forward with this lesson?

And what did the wasp learn?

It had an experience in which a human helped it instead of harming it.  That experience became part of “wasp consciousness.” 

This alone might not change how wasps behave towards humans, but it did shift the energies of human/wasp relationships just a tiny bit.  And as you may recall, an accumulation of tiny bits of energy changes contribute ultimately to make a big shift.